A Selection of MOOCs on Sustainability and Ethics for January 2018 (Part 1 of 2)

Every year there is an increase in the number of MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) available on sustainability topics. These courses are available for free online and open to anyone with an interest in the topic, lasting between three and fourteen weeks and taking three to eight hours per week to complete. Below is a selection of such courses starting in January 2018, listed by topic, from primarily PRME signatory schools.

Foundations of Development Policy: This course uses economic theory and data analysis to explore the economic lives of the poor, and the ways to design and implement effective development policy. MIT – starts February 6 2018.

The Challenges of Global Poverty: This course uses economics to understand some of the root causes behind underdevelopment and the constraints and trade-offs the poor face when making decisions. It also looks into anti-poverty strategies and policies. MIT – Starts February 6 2018.

What are the Sustainable Development Goals – This course provides a brief introduction to the Sustainable Development goals, what they are, how they came about, the goals and targets themselves as well as next steps and our role. Gowi – starts now.

 

Social Norms, Social Change: This course is on social norms, the rules that glue societies together. It teaches hot to diagnose social norms, and how to distinguish them from other social constructs, like customs or conventions. Unicef – starts January 1 2018.

 

Children’s Human Rights – An Interdisciplinary Introduction: This course combines law, psychology, sociology, history, educational and health sciences, economy and anthropology to explore critical issues concerning children’s rights. University of Geneva – starts January 8 2018.

 

Women in Leadership Inspiring Positive Change: This course aims to inspire and empower women and men across the world to engage in purposeful career development and take on leadership for important causes – to lead change with more conviction and confidence – and improve our workplaces and communities for all. Case Western Reserve University – starts January 8 2018.

Droi International de L’Eau Douce (course in French) – This course explores the laws that regulate and produce freshwater and the responsibilities of different stakeholders. University of Geneva – starts January 1 2018.

 

Sustainable Energy: This series of courses explores the complex nature of energy generation, distribution and supply and the challenges of transitioning to a sustainable energy future. University of Queensland – starts January 23 2018.

Energy Principles and Renewable Energy: This course provides an introduction to the language of energy, key scientific principles that underpin energy systems, future energy challenges and available renewable energy options. University of Queensland – starts January 23 2018.

Just Money: Banking as if Society Mattered: This course explores how banks can use capital as a tool to promote social and environmental wellbeing. MIT – starts March 7 2018.

Supply Chain Innovation: How Technology Can Create a Sustainable Future: This course looks at new technologies and how they can make supply chains more sustainable. It also explores global trends in global and supply chain innovation. University of Twente – starts now.

Debt Sustainability Analysis: What are the tools to access debt sustainability? How can countries effectively manage their sovereign debt? To answer these questions, this course combines theory with hands-on exercises. IMF – self paced.

From Corporate Social Responsibility to Corporate Social Innovation: Based on real-world experiences from business leaders, learn how to develop and lead social innovation initiatives that create both economic and social value. Babson – starts January 16 2018.

 

Part 2 will be posted tomorrow.

2017 Good Practices in Responsible Management Education (Part 1 of 2)

This past year was a big year for the Principles for Responsible Management. As a network of networks we celebrated our 10th anniversary including an opportunity to come together and look both back and forwards at the PRME Global Forum in July 2017 in New York City. This year was also the second year that the Sustainable Development Goals have been in effect, including a significant increase in the impact that management education is having in the realisation of these Goals. Many of this past year’s PRiMEtime posts have highlighted this collective impact.

This is the 6th year that I write PRiMEtime. I started this blog in 2011 in collaboration with the PRME Secretariat as a way of showcasing all of the exciting initiatives that Signatories were taking part in. Not only has this shown schools and the business community what is possible but in many instances this has also helped raise awareness of these initiatives within the schools and helped the individuals involved receive more support internally. Thank you to all of the individuals who are not only driving these initiatives but who took the time to share their stories here. PRiMEtime is now a database of good practices from around the world with over 1000 examples of how management education is embedding sustainability the Principles into their work.

This year 60 new articles were posted featuring over 100 examples from more 90 different Signatories in 27 countries. We have also introduced a number of Special Feature Months providing a more in-depth look at how schools are approaching a specific SDG. In this 2-part year-end post we review the examples featured this year, (roughly) organised around the SDGs. Simply click on the links to read the full article.

I look forward to another year of featuring your initiatives. Please feel free to email me your suggestions as well as any requests for 2018.

Many signatories provide opportunities for their students to work on projects to better their local communities. One example featured was the I’m the Change Initiative from the Institute of Management Technology in India which is a mandatory programme for all students. Many Signatories organise awareness raising events and conferences during the school year focused on PRME and sustainability. At the University of Greenwich Business School their full day conference focused on “Shaping Business Opportunities in a World of Uncertainty” not just organised by students but is organised as part of the requirements for one of their courses.

Students have always been, and will continue to be an important driver of PRME and sustainability on campus. At FEA-RP/USP in Brazil the Sustainable Student Organisation Awards promote and recognise projects that benefit the school and the local community. Students at Universidad EAFIT in Colombia are exploring solutions to local SDG challenges through a range of projects on campus. Copenhagen Business School is looking at a range of ways to really embed sustainability into their campus with the support of a new Sustainable Infrastructure Taskforce.

On PRiMEtime we regularly post blogs summarizing the lists of MOOCs on sustainability topics offered by Signatories. Many of these MOOCs are either available on an on-going basis or have regular start dates so even past posts provide a good resources. If you are planning a MOOC for 2018 please email so this can be included in the next post in January. For 2017 this included a selection of the MOOCs available in Winter 2017 focused around economic, social and environmental issues as well as in September 2017 focused around strategy, cities, social impact, funding and ethics. An update of a very popular post on Primetime from several years ago focused on how to use online games to engage in sustainability was also shared. It provides links to a number of online games that can be used in the classroom organised by SDG.

A post in March also looked at What Students Think About Responsible Management Education outlining a number of insights pulled from a recent survey on students views on sustainability in business education. Another post that came out just before the PRME Global Forum looked at why Management’s Education’s Role in the SDGs isn’t limited to providing quality education and how there are many different ways that Schools can and should engage.

Several posts included projects that tackle SDG 5 around Gender Equality but two focused in on the topic. Students at Slippery Rock University in the United States were the catalyst to creating a new Centre on campus that focuses on development female business leaders. Through their Diversity Institute, Ted Rogers School of Management at Ryerson University in Canada has been focused on ensuring that management education is accessible and every student is empowered to achieve his or her full potential.

Once again this year faculty from Signatory schools shared examples of companies within their countries that are considered sustainability leaders, companies engaged in a range of activities across all SDGs. Featured sustainable business examples for 2017 included:

Australia: Kindling, Crepes for Change, eWater Systems

Brazil: Votorantim Cimentos, CPFL

Canada: Net Zero Waste, EcoDairy, Nature’s Path Foods, Magnet, Sharbucks Canada, Scadding Court Community Centre, Telus, Stantec, Nova Scotia designer Tabitha Osler

Colombia: EPM, Grupo Sura, ISA

India: Jayaashree Industries, Goonj

Nigeria: Wecyclers, Adcem Healthcare, Doreo Partner’s Babban Gona

Poland: Izodom 2000, Solaris Bus & Coach, Seedia

South Africa: Zoona, AllLife Insurance, GreenCape

Sweden: Filippa K, Max Hamburgers, Axel Johnson AB

UK: Triodas Bank, Bordeaux Quay, Resource Futures, Low Carbon SW, Eunomia

The month of October was a Special Feature month focused on Impact Investing and how schools are engaging in this topic in particular within the Finance curriculum. A range of resources on Impact Investing were presented as well as a summary of ten ways schools are bringing Impact Investing to campus featuring specific examples from ten different signatories including Tsinghua University in China and ESADE Business School in Spain to name but two. Smith School of Business in Canada shared their experiences training the next generation of impact investing professionals through their Social Finance Academy. Sauder School of Business presented their approach to promoting impact investing not just within the business school but externally as well. Impact Investing Competitions organised by different business schools around the world including a more in-depth feature on not just the competition at IESE but also their newly launched student managed impact investment fund. We finished off the month with a special look at the University of Cape Town’s work on promoting impact investing in the African Context and training a new generation of leaders in South Africa and beyond.

Resources on the 17 Sustainable Development Goals – December edition – part 1 of 2

There are a growing number of excellent resources around the 17 Sustainable Development Goals, many of which can be used in the classroom or to inspire activities within University and Business School campuses. In this new series we will regularly feature a range of different resources that can be used to engage in, and raise awareness of the 17 SDGs. If you are creating new resources or have any favourites please send them so they can be featured as well. Part 1 will feature resources for Goals 1-9 and part 2 will feature resources for Goals 10 through to 17. For more Primetime posts related to the SDGs click here.

Assessing Bottlenecks: With the SDGs, the question is: What are the actions that will take us forward more quickly across a broader range of interlinked goals? This report explores the interlinkages and integrated nature of the SDGs and the need to go beyond silos to taking an integrated approach to development interventions. The SDG Accelerator and Bottleneck Assessment tool development by the UN Development Programme explores these.

Zero Hunger Challenge: The Zero Hunger Challenge reflects five elements from within the SDGs, which taken together, can end hunger, eliminate all forms of malnutrition and build inclusive and sustainable food systems. Stakeholders including universities can become participants of the Challenge by making a commitment to take action that will have a demonstrable, quantifiable impact. The challenge website also offers a range of resources and videos that can be used to create your own version of the Zero Hunger challenge on campus.

Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: This site includes a series of dilemmas and case studies that were developed to support efforts by business to respect human rights in their operations and supply chains. Cases are focused on a number of topics including living wages, working hours, human trafficking, doing business sin conflict affected countries and indigenous peoples’ rights.

World Youth Skills Day: Youth are almost three times more likely to be unemployed than adults and are continuously exposed to lower quality of jobs, greater labor market inequalities, and longer and more insecure school-to-work transitions. This is particularly the case for women. The 15th of July ,World Youth Skills Day, aims draw special attention to this issue. UNESCO has developed a special kit with a range of videos that can be used.

Women’s Empowerment Principles: Over 1,000 business leaders have adopted the Women Empowerment Principles that are used to empower women in the workplace, marketplace and community. The site includes a Gender Gap Analysis Tool to help companies identify strengths, gaps and opportunities to improve their performance eon gender equality as well as a series of resources that can be used in the classroom.

Guidance for Companies on Respecting the Human Rights to Water and Sanitation: This resource provides companies with practical measures on how to bring a human rights lens to their existing corporate water stewardship practices. It is on of several publications provided by the CEO Water Mandate, a group of companies working to develop, implement and disclose water sustainability polices and practices and sharing best and emerging practices.

Sustainable Energy for All: The site includes information to indicators for sustainable energy that give policy makers and investors detailed country-level insights for levelling the playing field for sustainable energy worldwide. ‘Heat maps’ available on the site, combine and analyse some of these data sets to show leaders where they can make the biggest and fastest inroads towards the SDGs.

Decent work and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: The International Labour works to set labour standards, develop policies and devise programmes promoting decent work for all. Their site offers a range of resources around decent work and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, a cross cutting theme that impacts and is impacted by many of the other SDGs. They also have a number of Notes on specific issues such as green jobs, national employment policies, skills and engaging the private sector on decent work.

The Equator Principles: The Equator Principles is a risk management framework, adopted by financial institutions, for determining, assessing and managing environmental and social risk in projects. It is primarily intended to provide a minimum standard for due diligence to support responsible risk decision-making. It currently covers over 70 percent of international Project Finance debt in emerging markets.

Impact Investing in the African Context – University of Cape Town

 

This past month, PRiMEtime has featured a number of programmes from universities around the world focused on impact investing. We finish off the series with an example from South Africa, from the University of Cape Town. There one faculty member has created a special one week intensive course focused on impact investing in the African context. I spoke with Aunnie Patton Power from the Bertha Centre for Social Innovation at the University of Cape Town about their initiatives in this space.

What is happening in Impact Investing in South Africa?

Impact investing on the continent is certainly growing.  It has been dominated by international funds in the past, but we are starting to see the emergence of funds based on the continent looking to deploy funds.  There is a lot of opportunity for local funds to partner with international funds to bring down costs around due diligence and ensure better local knowledge. According to the Global Impact Investing Network, sub-Saharan Africa makes up 22% of global impact enterprises.

How is the University of Cape Town exploring the topic?

One of the ways that we are looking at impact investing is through a course we have called Impact Investing in Africa, which is running for the third time this year. I created this course after I worked on the Oxford Impact Investing Program and saw the need for an African based course to help unlock capital on the continent towards impact.

The course takes place over 5 days. It is designed for a wide range of individuals including wealth managers, consultants, funders, lawyers and other financial intermediaries. We start with the landscape, language and themes of impact and then move on to how to find and evaluate deals and funds and how to measure impact.  We then look at portfolio construction and innovative financing structures as well as how to build strategies with clients and within institutions and the ins and outs of starting a fund.  Finally, we do a site visit to local enterprises that have received impact investment and are at the scale stage as well as visiting a set of incubators to spend time discussing the very early deal stage and what is needed.

Are there any resources on Impact Investing specific to the African context?

We have also been working on a number of case studies focused on impact investment in Africa. When we started there were almost no cases on the topic. It took us nearly a year and resulted in 14 cases (we’ve since developed 5 more).  I worked with an exceptional case writer and even roped in a few students.  The cases feature eighteen impact enterprises and sixteen funds from eleven countries across the continent and are shared in partnership with the Skoll Centre for Social Entrepreneurship at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. One of our cases won the 2016 CEEMAN case writing competition.  The cases are now used in our course and across the globe in dozens of other institutions.

The Bertha Centre for Social Innovation has an Innovative Financing Initiative that does projects with funders around the globe, convenes events and gathering, conducts research and enables teaching across the entirety of UCT.  We teach Impact Investing / Innovative Finance across all of our programs as either an elective or a core course.

What have been some of your successes?

It’s been so incredible to watch our alumni from the past two courses.  They’ve gone on to start their own funds and start funds within foundations and banks and development organizations.  They’ve also put impact investment practices into place at large institutions such as consulting firms, law firms and real estate practices.  One of the things that I’ve enjoyed is seeing how they support one another as an alumni group.  Several alums with significant experience now sit on the board of younger alums’ funds and organizations.  We also get a lot of new students through our alumni. We also see a large demand from international development organizations and non-profits keen to be involved as investors to ensure better sustainability for themselves and their underlying projects.

What advice would you have for other schools thinking of putting something similar into place?

Spend a significant amount of time getting your curriculum and your mix of speakers correct.  There needs to be one strong convenor pulling the whole thing together that understands how the content should flow and how to tie it all together.  There are more and more options for curriculum available, so you don’t need to create your own, but you do need to create a cohesive, comprehensive experience for your students.

What’s next for the initiative?

We are holding our 3rd course from the 13th – 17th of November 2017.  We have 40 participants signed up from 15 countries.  I’m very excited about the participants this year.  I think we will always cap it at 40 as I don’t want it to get too large and take away from the experience, but it is amazing to grow the alumni base.

Fostering Discussions around Impact Investing Internally and Externally – Sauder School of Business

This month PRiMEtime is exploring different ways that business schools are engaging in Impact Investing, whether that is through their teaching, extra curricular activities, research or events.

I recently had the chance to speak with Christie Stephenson, the Executive Director of the Dhillon Centre for Business Ethics at the Sauder School of Business at the University of British Columbia in Canada about the work that they are doing around Impact Investing and Responsible Investing. Her center, which became operational in 2016 and has a major focus on responsible investing, works in close collaboration with UBC Sauder Centre for Social Innovation and Impact Investing, which was formed in 2007.

 

Why impact investing? Why is it important that students learn about impact investing?

Impact investing is a fundamental shift in thinking about how profits and societal/ environmental good relate to each other. It rejects the notion that the two outcomes are mutually exclusive. Today, many business students come into university truly wanting to make a positive impact on society. Yet they’re studying business and their interest is in business – not necessarily charity or non-profit management. Impact investing provides another channel/avenue to work in global issues other than traditional charities that allows them combine their interest in business with their desire to create social impact. Incorporating environmental, social and governance considerations in investment decision making is also a major trend with retail and institutional investors and therefore it is more important than ever that students understand this. This traditionally gets referred to as Responsible Investing. Some people consider responsible investing a type of impact investing, other people consider impact investing a type of responsible investing. At UBC Sauder we tend to describe them as different, but closely connected, types of social finance.

 

What are some of the interesting research that the Centre has been doing around impact investing or is planning to do?

The UBC Sauder Centre for Social Innovation & Impact Investing (SauderS3i), which was formed in 2007, focuses in large part on impact investing, as the name suggests. SauderS3i is best explained by using a demand and supply model. It creates demand for impact investment capital by incubating successful social enterprises through the iHub program and it coordinates the supply of impact investment capital through working in partnership with the Pacific Impact Investor Network (PIIN). The Centre works with PIIN members to help them understand issues more thoroughly as well as how impact investing can play a role in their portfolios. The Dhillon Centre focuses specifically on responsible investing within the impact investing spectrum. This can be described as the integration of environmental, social and governance risk and opportunity considerations in public markets investing, whether that’s retail or institutional. One of the Centre’s four pillars is research and recruitment is currently underway for a lead academic to develop this pillar.

 

How are students engaged in impact investing? What kind of opportunities do they have?

Every summer, SauderS3i hires several interns to work on Impact Investing projects commissioned to us through PIIN members. They range from in-depth analysis projects on specific issues (water, education, housing etc.) to providing insights into impact investing portfolio construction.

The Dhillon Centre also hires a number of part time students. As well, with SFU Beedie Business School it hosts a free two-day workshop on responsible investment for students. We also host a variety of events for students including recent panels and workshops on topics such as “Careers in Social Finance” and “Impact Investing as a Major Philanthropic Trend”.

We currently also have opportunities within the curriculum including an elective on Impact Investing: Social Finance in the 21st Century that ran for the first time last year. In the past we have organized a range of events for students including an Impact Investing Competition.

 

What have been some of your successes?

SauderS3i has been working on creating one of the first university-based seed-stage funds. UBC has a strong entrepreneurial culture and a number of rockstar social entrepreneurs through our iHub programme (for example Wize Monkey, Arbutus Medical and Alinker). The impact fund aims to provide seed-stage funding to enterprises that are ready to make the next step from an early-stage idea to scaling growth and operations. On the research front, we’re extremely interested in how impact investing venture capital differs from traditional “Silicon Valley” venture capital. Unlike tech start-ups (like Facebook, Google, Uber), not many social enterprises will have traditional exits like IPO or get sold to another company. So we’re looking at how deal structures can be designed to respect this different dynamic, and at the same time create returns for investors.

Both Centres do a lot of work to foster discussions around Impact Investing in the community. This includes hosting meetings to bring together impact investors in Vancouver and events open to the public. For instance this month, the Dhillon Centre co-hosted an event with the SFU Beedie School of Business called “Reconciliation: A New Relationship for Investors” which explored how investors can take into account how companies work with indigenous people and communities.

Sauder S3i’s executive director, James Tansey, is on the Federal Social Finance and Social Innovation Co-Creation Steering Group that is charting out what’s next for Canada’s social finance market. The Dhillon Centre has been invited to speak on impact investing and responsible investing at numerous industry events over the past year, including those hosted by the Chartered Financial Analyst Society, the Responsible Investment Association of Canada, the Conference Board of Canada, and the International Corporate Governance Network, among others.

 

What’s next?

After five years of successful collaboration between Coast Capital Savings Credit Union and UBC Sauder Centre for Social Innovation & Impact Investing, the iHub is moving on to the next stage of our journey. Starting in November 2017 the iHub social venture accelerator will become an integral part of entrepreneurship@UBC which is the venture accelerator at the University of British Columbia.

Sauder S3i is continually trying to build the impact investing market in Vancouver and western Canada. In the coming months, it will be refining and improving its relationship with PIIN and launching a new investor portal / public impact investing resource guide (www.impactinvestmentforum.com).

The Dhillon Centre is supporting the development of more social finance content within the academic curriculum. We are a member of the iInternational Sustainable Finance Faculty Consortium which held its first in-person meeting this summer in Chicago and appears have great potential as a collective effort to support the advance of impact and responsible investment as an academic discipline.

 

What are your favourite resources around impact investing? Are there any other impact investing programmes at other schools that you admire?

Anyone interested in impact investing must subscribe to ImpactAlpha’s Daily Brief. You’ll never be out of the loop once you’ve subscribed.

The Impact Terms Project is also very useful. It has a great library of useful concepts related to private equity/ venture capital in impact investing.

Oxford University’s Skoll Centre for Social Entrepreneurship has been a real leader in this space, although they have less of an emphasis on impact investing.

In terms of responsible investing sources, in Canada the best single source is the Responsible Investment Association of Canada. Internationally it may be the Principles for Responsible Investment. There are also some leading practitioners worth following, such as Sustainalytics, NEI Investments, and the Shareholder Association for Research and Education (SHARE).

 

Any advice for other schools looking at exploring impact investing?

Simply put, it would be “get up to speed sooner rather than later”. Impact and responsible investing are major trends that are changing not only the nature of our capital markets but have the potential for the kind of social and environmental impact that is absolutely critical to people and the planet. With the values shifts taking place because of demographic changes, there isn’t a business school out there that shouldn’t be looking at how to integrate these subjects into their curriculum and activities.

 

 

Management Education’s Role in the SDGs isn’t limited to providing quality education (SDG4). It is broader and more important than that.

When I discuss the Sustainable Development Goals with business school representatives, and ask what kind of initiatives they are working on in relation to these Goals, the answer is often the same: “We educate, therefore our focus is on SDG 4: Quality Education”.

But focusing solely on, and stopping at SDG 4 is a mistake, and a missed opportunity for the institutions in question and society at large. The role that business schools play is much broader and more important than that. The wider community engaged in the SDGs most often fails to recognise the crucial role that business schools can and are playing in the SDGs but they aren’t the only ones; business schools themselves generally fail to recognise the extent of their own role.

The Sustainable Development Goals are unique in that they are a globally recognised set of goals that outline where we need to go as a planet and where all stakeholders should direct their attention. It is a common language that unites us, that allows for partnerships to grow across sectors, industries, disciplines, all through this shared platform. It is a key for schools to connect into these discussions, to participate in them and to influence them all for the benefit of the school, its faculty and students.

  1. Ensure everyone on campus knows what the goals are and why they are important: Sobey School of Business in Canada organised a faculty session on the SDGs with a focus on how faculty can better embed discussion of the Goals into their courses. Faculty were asked to commit in writing how they planned to do this in their 2016/17 courses through the use of cases, assignments, additional readings etc.
  2. Identify which SDGs are most material to your institution: Hanken School of Economics in Finland identified which SDGS were most material to them in order to prioritize first steps. They are now working to understand where they stand on each of them and are exploring how to move forward.
  3. Embedding the SDGs into the curriculum: Slipper Rock University of Pennsylvania and La Trobe Business School have both been working to benchmark the coverage of sustainability topics within the business curriculum by mapping coverage of the SDGs taught in the courses offered in the core curriculum and whether it is part of the text, a module, part of an assignment or discussions.
  4. Embedding the SDGs into class assignments/discussions: Students at University of Colorado Denver in the US are tasked with developing an implementation plan for a company of their choice to address specific sustainable development goals and identify how the business could make progress against the specific targets associated with the goals. Students also need to consider actions that the United Nations could take to encourage more businesses to address the SDGs.
  5. Explore possible solutions: Students at Hult International Business School in the US were challenged to create a company-led “system” to solve a specific Sustainable Development Goal. Proposals ranged from training FARC rebels to meet employment needs while helping them to re-integrate into Columbian society; to challenging companies to get rid of boxes by collaborating with retailers to create new distribution systems for cereals.
  6. Facilitate interdisciplinary and multi stakeholder discussions to move the goals forward: Kemmy Business School’s Accountability Research Cluster hosted an international seminar on Tax and Poverty as part of their series Architects of a Better World. The event, which brought together a range of stakeholders focused around Goal 1 of the SDGs: No Poverty, the first time that the role of tax in delivering on the SDGs has been specifically addressed in Ireland.
  7. Work on the goals within your own institution: ISAE/FGV in Brazil reports on what they are doing on campus to reach the SDGS within their own operations including through waste management, water consumption, ethics and corruption on campus, gender equality and access to education.
  8. Use the SDGs to guide research priorities and impact: The University of Wollongong in Australia reports on what percentage of their research relates to the different SDGs and Manchester Met Business School is aligning their research closely with the SDGs.
  9. Developing partnerships to advance the goals: Faculty at Nottingham University Business School in the UK are collaborating with an international group of scholars to develop an innovative framework for assessing the impacts of Multinational Corporations on issues relating to the SDGs, in particular SDG 16 Peace Justice and Strong Institutions. The toolkit is being testing through close collaboration with partners from a range of industries as well as research organisations and civil society.
  10. Report on your efforts and impact in relation to the SDGs: University of Applied Sciences HTW Chur has organised their reporting around the SDGS with a particular emphasis on which SDGs they have a direct, indirect or collateral impact on.

Every one of the SDGs impact, and are impacted by management education, the research that you do, the decisions that your graduates make and how, as a network of schools, we create value. Each of the goals requires businesses and other organisations to work together on the challenges and developing and implementing the solutions. The upcoming 2017 Global Forum for Responsible Management Education – 10 Years of PRME in New York City on the 18-19 and of July will focus on sharing best practices in relation to making the Global Goals local business and how to bring the SDGs into every classroom.

Sustainable Business Examples from Around the World – Hong Kong, Kenya, and Canada

img_4721As businesses become more and more engaged in sustainability around the world, we are presented with an increasing range of examples of active companies. However, when I speak with students and faculty, they say that they often hear about the same examples from the same international companies over and over again.

In an attempt to share some new best practice examples, I asked a handful of faculty members from around the world about their favourite classroom examples of local companies that are actively involved in sustainability. Here are some examples from Kenya, Hong Kong, and Canada.

Jessica Vaghi, E4Impact Foundation, ALTIS Postgraduate School of Business and Society, Italy (examples from Kenya)

Continental Renewable Energy (Corec) is a Kenyan based company that recycles waste plastic into eco-friendly building material and sell the hardware to developers whose problem is high material cost by providing affordable and durable construction products. It prevented 700 tons of waste from landfills, made 26,000 posts and signed orders over 10.000 roofing tiles by customers across Kenya in 2 years of operations.

Stamp Investment is a Kenyan enterprise that distributes briquettes and multitasking fuel efficient stoves, which enables schools and households to have access to safe drinking water with a reduction of 75 % in water borne diseases. The business won the Grand Challenges Africa “pitching your innovation” competition in 2016 and has been national winner of the most innovative business idea during Enablis Chase bank, ILO business launch pad competition in 2011.

NUCAFE – National Union of Coffee Agribusiness and Farm Enterprises is a sustainable market-driven system of coffee farmer organisations empowered to increase their household incomes through enhanced entrepreneurship and innovation in 19 districts of Uganda. NUCAFE Contributed in influencing the development of a National Coffee Policy and to improve gender relations among coffee farming households and was nominated by AGRA best Africa farmer organisation of 2013 in income diversity category.

Click here for more information about E4Impact Foundation and their work in Kenya.

Pamsy Hui, Hong Kong Polytechnic University Faculty of Business, Hong Kong

It is often a misconception that interesting work in the field of sustainability can only be done by companies with a lot of resources.  In Hong Kong, many small and medium enterprises are doing very interesting things with limited resources.  For instance, Diving Adventure Ltd., a company providing training services and products related to scuba diving, has always put the environment in the forefront of its business decisions.  They regularly collaborate with NGOs, the government, and other organisations on environment protection initiatives (e.g., underwater cleansing activities, reef check).  What is impressive is that for such a small operation, they go far beyond just caring about environmental sustainability.  They are also committed to create employment opportunities to minority groups, released prisoners, and reformed drug users, to help integrate them into the society.  On the service side, they regularly provide training to underprivileged children and individuals with disabilities, providing a sense of inclusiveness for people who are often overlooked, if not discriminated, by the society.

Another example is Baby-Kingdom.com, a parental online forum for parents to share information and experiences related to bringing up children.  In addition to donating to NGOs, they help NGOs advertise on their forum, bringing awareness among their large number of users. They set up the Baby Kingdom Environmental Protection Education Fund in 2008 to support programmes in primary schools to educate school children on concepts such as greenhouse gas reduction and green diet.  Consistent with its family-friendly image, Baby-Kingdom.com started family-friendly practices well before they became a trend in large corporations.  The well-being of children is central to its human resource practices, and the company is often recognised for being a socially responsible employer.

A third example of a company doing interesting things related to sustainability is 4M Industrial Development Limited, a toy design company specialising in educational toys.  In designing their products, 4M consciously favors sustainable materials and supply chains with lower carbon footprints.  In addition, 4M partners with NGOs in multiple ways.  With the Spastics Association of Hong Kong, they adapt part of their manufacturing process to support the disabled.  It also works with different NGOs to promote their causes.  Many of 4M’s products have a green message behind them (e.g., Paper Recycling Kit, Trash Robot Kit).  For each box of the Clean Water Science Kit, for example, 4M donates a portion of its profits to NGOs to fund water-purifying projects in the third world.  Meanwhile, children buying the kit would get a message about the project in the box.

Click here to read about the Interdisciplinary Wellness Clinic at Hong Kong Polytechnic University.

Deborah De Lange, Ryerson University, Canada

Our Horizon is a national not-for-profit organization led by Robert Shirkey that works with governments to require climate change labels on gas pumps. The idea is a low-cost, globally scalable intervention to communicate the hidden costs of fossil fuels to end users and drive change upstream.

ZooShare is a biogas plant led by Daniel Bida that turns animal waste from the Toronto Zoo and food waste from grocery stores into fertilizer and renwable power for the Ontario grid. The process aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 10,000 tonnes of C02 each year. The biogas plant is starting construction now and will be operational in the summer of 2017.

Purpose Capital is an impact advisory firm that mobilises all forms of capital – financial, physical, human and social – to accelerate social progress. Alex Kjorven is the Director of Corporate Development and is a graduate student in the EnSciMan programme at Ryerson.

Click here to learn more about the interdisciplinary EnSciMan programme at Ryerson University.

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