An Overview of MOOCs offered by United Nations Agencies (Part 3 of 3)

Every year there is an increase in the number of MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) available on sustainability topics. These courses are available for free online and open to anyone with an interest in the topic, lasting between three and fourteen weeks and taking three to eight hours per week to complete. But Universities are not the only organisations offering these MOOCs. A growing number of UN agencies are developing MOOCs as a way of not only raising awareness about the issues that they focus on, but also training individuals around the world who are working on these sustainability issues and the SDG on the ground. Most of the courses are self-paced and available in multiple language. (Click here to read Part 1 which focused on UNWomen, World Bank and IMF or  Part 2 which focused on UNITAR, FAO, UNFMEA and UN.)

 

Most of the UN initiatives do not have their own online learning platforms and instead offer courses on various platforms and often in partnership with different organisations. This makes them a bit trickier to find so it is worth signing up for the newsletters of the initiatives you are most interested to get more up to date information.

For example, current courses offered by UNESCO include:

  • Inequalities in Latin America and the Caribbean: This course, which is also available in Spanish, addresses the current regional landscape of inequalities, warns of its dramatic consequences, and offers transformative strategies that can be designed to improve social policies and public management.
  • Climate Justice Lessons from the Global South: This course will deal with some of the key issues related to the ethical dimensions implied by climate change – learning especially from the problems faced as well as the resilience models formulated by the marginalized sectors of society or the so-called “Global South”.

 

United Nations University currently has a course in partnership with The Nature Conservancy that aims to build awareness of the importance of Mangroves to healthy ecosystems and human communities. This multi part course is designed to build expertise in mangrove biology, ecology, assessment, management, and restoration and is predominantly aimed at young academics, professionals, managers, and any other interested individuals, especially from developing countries

 

Specific UN initiatives also offer a range of e courses to help partners in the implementation of their frameworks. For example the UN-REDD Programme (UN Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation) provides a range of 12 courses in English, French and Spanish that cover the topic of forests, carbon sequestration and climate change.

 

The UN Environment Programme’s Environment Academy usually offers online courses. At the moment they are offering:

  • From Source to Sea to Sustainability:This course will offer a holistic conceptual and practical approach to the issue of land based sources of pollution and their impacts, covering the scientific basics of nutrient cycling and pollution impacts, methodologies and assessment tools, financial mechanisms to protect our waters, policy and governance issues, as well as technologies for turning waste into resources.

 

Last but not least, the UN Global Compact offers some courses in collaboration with other partners including:

  • Ethical Cities: A course developed in collaboration with RMIT University and Future Learn, it introduces the notion of the ethical city and examines it from the perspective of ethical leadership, urban development and planning, ethical local business and engaged, ethical citizenry.
  • Human Rights and Business: This learning tool provides an introduction and overview to human rights for a business audience, developed in collaboration with UN Human Rights.

An Overview of MOOCs offered by United Nations Agencies (Part 2 of 3)

Every year there is an increase in the number of MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) available on sustainability topics. These courses are available for free online and open to anyone with an interest in the topic, lasting between three and fourteen weeks and taking three to eight hours per week to complete. But Universities are not the only organisations offering these MOOCs. A growing number of UN agencies are developing MOOCs as a way of not only raising awareness about the issues that they focus on, but also training individuals around the world who are working on these sustainability issues and the SDG on the ground. Most of the courses are self-paced and available in multiple language. (Click here for Part 1 on UNWomen, World Bank and IMF – Part 3 will be posted next week).

UN CC: e-Learn offers free online climate change courses. Each course is developed in collaboration with different UN agencies depending on the specific topic. Courses are available in eight languages and are all self-paced and take approximately an hour to complete. Courses include:

  • Human Health and Climate Change: This course, in partnership with the World Health Organisation, provides an introduction to the health challenges, as well as the opportunities, that can by associated to climate change.
  • Cities and Climate Change: This course, developed in collaboration with UN-Habitat, focuses on climate change in urban areas, covering how cities are affected by climate change, how they contribute to it, as well as how they plan for it.It contains one module which takes around 2 hours to complete.
  • Introductory e-Course on Climate Change: This course, developed in collaboration with UNITAR, provides “everything you need to know” about the basics of climate change, from climate change science to governance.
  • Children and Climate Change: This course, developed in collaboration with UNICEF, presents how children and youth can be impacted by climate change, how their resilience to climate change can be strengthened, and how they can act on climate change.

 

AGORA is UNICEF’s global hub for learning and development. Courses are available in six language including Chinese, French, Arabic and Portuguese. You need to sign up in order to view the courses but there are dozens covering the whole range of focus areas that UNICEF covers including

  • Child Rights and Why They Matter: This short course will transform and/or refresh your understanding of child rights and a child rights approach, introduce you to UNICEF’s mandate as it relates to child rights, and inspire you to apply a child rights lens to your everyday work and life.
  • Performance Assessment at UNICEF: How should we assess individual performance? And when should we assess individual performance? In order to increase our impact as a results-based organization, we need to apply a consistent approach to individual performance assessment. This course aims to help you understand how and when to effectively assess individual performance at UNICEF.
  • Introduction to Ethics in Evidence Generation: In this course, you will explore the importance of Ethical Evidence Generation at UNICEF, the principles and requirements of the UNICEF Procedure for Ethical Standards in Research, Evaluations and Data Collection and Analysis and how this applies to the work that is undertaken across the organization.

UNICEF also provides MOOCs in collaboration with Universities and available on commonly used MOOC platforms. For example Social Norms, Social Change is a 2 part courses developed in collaboration with the University of Pennsylvania that looks at social norms, the rules that glue societies together. It teaches how to diagnose social norms, and how to distinguish them from other social constructs, like customs or conventions. These distinctions are crucial for effective policy interventions aimed to create new, beneficial norms or eliminate harmful ones. The course teaches how to measure social norms and the expectations that support them, and how to decide whether they cause specific behaviours.

 

InforMEA.leaning is part of the United Nations information portal on multilateral environmental agreements. It has a range of courses on agreements relating to biological diversity, chemicals and waste, climate, international law, and oceans and freshwater. Courses include:

 

UNITAR offers a range of free courses including

  • Conflict Analysis: This one-day course looks at conflict including what it is, sources of conflict, complexities of conflict, evolution and the different actors involved.
  • Human Rights and the Environment: This 3 hour self-paced course provides a general introduction to the relationship between human rights and the environment including procedural and substantive obligations relating to the environment.
  • Mainstreaming the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: This course provides an in-depth and wide ranging guidance on how to mainstream the 2030 Agenda into national strategies and policies with case studies.

 

The FAO E-learning Centre has a range of courses including a demo class if you want to test out their format. The catalogue is extensive and includes courses on the SDGs that the FAO is focused on (in particular SDG 2 Zero Hunger) including:

An Overview of MOOCs offered by United Nations Agencies (part 1 of 3)

Every year there is an increase in the number of MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) available on sustainability topics. These courses are available for free online and open to anyone with an interest in the topic, lasting between three and fourteen weeks and taking three to eight hours per week to complete. But Universities are not the only organisations offering these MOOCs. A growing number of UN agencies are developing MOOCs as a way of not only raising awareness about the issues that they focus on, but also training individuals around the world who are working on these sustainability issues and the SDG on the ground. Most of the courses are self-paced and available in multiple languages. (Part 2 will be posted next week)

 

The UN Women Training Centre offers a range of courses in English, Spanish, French and Arabic, all free of charge. Courses are either self-paced, have fixed set dates and many of them can be customized for specific audiences. Many of the courses focus in on Sustainable Development Goal
5 on Gender Equality as well as Gender issues which are an important part across all of the SDGs. The self-paced courses take approximately 50 minutes to complete and current courses include:

  • Women’s Leadership and Decision Making: This course provides an introduction to the concepts, international framework, and methods for working toward gender equality and women’s empowerment. It also offers users the opportunity to make links between gender and specific thematic areas such as work; education; political participation; emergencies; peace and security; sexual and reproductive health; sexual and gender diversity and human rights; and violence against women.
  • Gender Equality in the World of Work: This course provides an introduction to the concepts, international framework, and methods for working toward gender equality and women’s empowerment. It also offers users the opportunity to make links between gender and specific thematic areas such as work; education; political participation; emergencies; peace and security; sexual and reproductive health; sexual and gender diversity and human rights; and violence against women.

 

The World Bank Open Learning Campus aims to provide learning that will build the leadership and technical capabilities of all development stakeholders-partners, practioners, policy makers, staff and the public. It offers a range of courses, also in several languages. You can choose from courses that are facilitated online or self paced. Courses include:

  • Introduction to the Global Environment Facility: This e-course provides an overview of the GEF, a unique international organization that is dedicated to safeguarding the global environment.
  • Introduction to the World Bank’s Environmental and Social Framework for External Audiences: This self paced courses provides an overview of the Bank’s Environmental and Social Framework which sets out the mandatory requirements for the World Bank and for Borrowers to address environmental and social risks and impacts in investment projects.
  • Fundamentals of Disaster Risk Finance: This course looks at how governments have to make difficult trade-offs in the aftermath of a disaster. Gain key insights into a range of innovative Disaster Risk Finance (DRF) projects across the globe.
  • Basics of Health Economics: Health economics play an important role in making health systems more effective, efficient, and equitable. This e-Learning course provides the foundations for participants to better understand health economics and its potential contribution to decision making in the health sector.
  • Greenhouse Gas Accounting 101: Accounting for GHG emissions allows the World Bank and its clients to estimate the impact of projects on GHG emissions early in the project cycle. This knowledge can help task teams and client countries mainstream climate change mitigation action in the project design, and thus is a key step in managing and reducing GHG emissions in a cost-effective manner.

 

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) provides its courses on IMFx again free of charge and available in several languages. Its courses focus on financial stability, international trade and sustainable economic growth. Current offerings include:

  • Debt Sustainability Analysis: This course explores what tools can be used to assess debt sustainability and how countries can effectively manage their sovereign debt with a range of hands on exercises and theories.
  • Financial Programming and Policies: Available in English, French, Spanish and Russian, this course looks at the macroeconomic accounts, their interrelationship, and the analysis of economic development.

Resources on the SDGs – Part 2 of 2

As we enter year 3 of the Sustainable Development Goals (which are set to be reached by 2030), organisations have had the time to do further research and publish findings relating to specific targets within each goal, shedding more light on the challenges and opportunities relating to each one. However the number of reports being launched daily can be a bit overwhelming, especially given that a lot of it is useful and interesting. Last week in Part 1 of this post I shared several reports focused on the SDGs. Here I have provided some websites with further resources on the SDGs.

World Bank SDG Atlas 2018

The Atlas of Sustainable Development Goals 2018 presents maps, charts, and stories related to the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. It discusses trends, comparisons, and measurement issues using accessible and shareable data visualizations. The data draw on the World Development Indicators  the World Bank’s compilation of internationally comparable statistics about global development and the quality of people’s lives. For each of the SDGs, relevant indicators have been chosen to illustrate important ideas.

 

Informea

InforMEA provides easy access to information on MEAs. You can consult treaty texts and provisions of decisions and resolutions adopted by the Governing Bodies of MEAs. You may browse Party information including contacts, national reports and national plans submitted under MEAs. Feel free to learn of terms and concepts as defined in the context of MEAs and consider taking one of over 20 free online courses introducing MEAs.

 

IISD Reporting Service

IISD Reporting Service provides neutral, autorative and up to the minute record of ongoing multilateral negoations on environment and sustainable development. You can access the meeting reports on their website or sign up to receive updates via email for a range of specific topics or on the Sustainable Development Goals more generally. Current coverage focuses on the Internatioanl Seabed Authority, High-Level Political Forum and the Open-Ended Working Group of the Parities to the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer. IISD has been providing this coverage since 2003.

 

Data is Beautiful

Data is Beautiful is a reddit page where individuals post visual representations of data including graphs, charts and maps. The goal is to explore how to effectively convey information and although aesthetics are important part of information visualization, the aim is not to create pretty pictures necessarily. Every month the community is invited to take part in a particular challenge where they are given a dataset to work with.

 

Our World in Data

Another website that aims to engage users in data is Our World in Data. Our World in Data is an online publication that shows how living conditions are changing. The aim is to give a global overview and to show changes over the very long run, so that we can see where we are coming from and where we are today. We need to understand why living conditions improved so that we can seek more of what works. The site has a newly launched SDG Tracker that tracks the latest data across all of the 17 SDGs. This serves an interactive hub where users can explore and track progress across all of the SDG indicators for which there is data available.

Also don’t forget about PRME Signatories developing databases of resources around the SDGs including the SDG Hub in South Africa at the University of Pretoria and the Online Resources Collection Around PRME from Sobey School of Business in Canada.

Recent Resources on the SDGs – Part 1 of 2

As we enter year 3 of the Sustainable Development Goals (which are set to be reached by 2030), organisations have had the time to do further research and publish findings relating to specific targets within each goal, shedding more light on the challenges and opportunities relating to each one. However the number of reports being launched daily can be a bit overwhelming, especially given that a lot of it is useful and interesting. In the next two posts I will share several of the reports that I have found strong lately as well as some websites with further resources on the SDGs.

The Sustainable Development Goals Report 2017

Using the most recent data available, the annual Sustainable Development Goals Report provides an overview of the world’s implementation efforts to date, highlighting areas of progress and areas where more action needs to be taken to ensure no one is left behind. This year’s report finds that while progress has been made over the past decade across all areas of development, the pace of progress has been insufficient and advancements have been uneven to fully meet the implementation of the SDGs. The 2018 version of the report should be coming out shortly. It is a quick read (there is even an executive summary that provides an even quicker read) but it gives a good overview of the issues.

 

A Guide to Sustainable Development Goals Interactions from Science to Implementation:

This guide published by the International Council for Science, one of the coordinating bodies of the Science and Technology major group, explores the nature of interlinkages between the SDGs. It is based on the premise that a science-informed analysis of interactions across SDG domains – which is currently lacking – can support more coherent and effective decision making, and better facilitate follow-up and monitoring of progress. Understanding possible trade-offs as well as synergistic relations between the different SDGs is crucial for achieving long-lasting sustainable development outcomes.

 

 

Sustainable Cities: Tracking Progress Towards Inclusive, Safe, Resilient and Sustainable Cities and Human Settlements – SDG 11 Synthesis Report:

This synthesis report is the first publication showing the progress, challenges and opportunities of global monitoring of SDG 11 which is focused on Sustainable Cities and Communities. The report was developed under the coordination of UN-Habitat, a focal point for sustainable urbanization and human settlements, but represents a joint position from the UN family on the global urban status of the Goal and other urban related global agendas such as the New Urban Agenda, Paris Agreement, Sendai Framework etc. It also looks at the linkages between SDG 11 and others targets.

 

Youth Solutions Report: 

The Youth Solutions Report features 50 game-changing projects led by young people, allowing them to showcase their work, and presenting them with opportunities to draw interest from potential supporters. This is the second report published by Sustainable Development Solutions Network Youth, the last Youth Solution Report was published in 2017. However this one also has a section with key recommendations for policies and action to support young people in particular in relation to entrepreneurship, intrapraneurship and finding jobs.

 

Frontier 2017 Emerging Issues of Environmental Concern: 

Published by the UNEP on an annual basis, this report addresses a range of emerging issues  facing the planet. It asks questions such as: How does our careless disposal of antimicrobial drugs produce bacteria that can resist them? Why are Marine Protected Areas vital to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals? Can off-grid solar plug the energy gap for cities in the developing world?

 

Fast-Rorward Progress, Leveraging Tech to Achieve the Global Goals

This report, published by the International Telecommunication Union, was written as a collaborative effort between 29 UN programmes as well as a number of NGOs This excellent report (one of my favourites) offers insights into the risks and opportunities in using information and Communication Technologies to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals.It is organised around each of the 17 SDGs and outlines how the use of big data is improving the design of policy and decision-making, the difference a mobile phone can make in the lives of humans and has a range of links to interesting initiatives around the globe.

 

Transformations to Achieve the Sustainable Development Goals

The World in 2050 (TWI2050) is a global multi-year, multi-stakeholder, interdisciplinary research initiative designed to provide a science-based, integrative approach to address all 17 SDGs. The new report brings together the work of more than 60 authors from 20 organizations involved in the initiative. The report explores six transformations and pathways that take a comprehensive approach to attaining the 17 SDGs. O
ne of the novel and defining features of the TWI2050 report is that it links integrated assessment modeling, with social science concepts to better reflect societal dynamics in the six transformations. After all, it is humans, and therefore society, who will make the economic, political, technological and cultural choices that determine the outcomes.

A Focus on Australia/New Zealand

This past December the Australia and New Zealand Chapter, officially transitioned from an Emerging to an Established Chapter, cementing their commitment to realising the Sustainable Development Goals through responsible management education. Although they only just became an Established Chapter, the region has always had a very active PRME Signatory base, a group of schools that are not only active within the PRME network, but also actively engaged in pushing the agenda forward with a range of innovative approaches. Because of this, schools from this region are regularly featured on PRiMEtime.

The month of February will be focused on sharing examples of good practices around embedding the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) into management education from schools across Australia and New Zealand. To kick things off, I spoke with Belinda Gibbons, the coordinator of the Chapter as well as the coordinator of PRME activities at the University of Wollongong in Australia about both the challenges and opportunities for the region as a whole.

Tell us a bit more about the Australia/New Zealand Chapter.

Schools in this region have been active in PRME since 2008. Currently 53% of universities in Australia and 75% in NZ are PRME signatories with a growth rate of approximately 2-3 signatories per year. Amidst vast land distances between signatories (there is a five hour time difference between our Schools), PRME members communicate on bi-monthly conference calls, virtual state based gatherings and via more formal annual forums and regular emails.

The work and in particular the courses that schools in this region offer have an important impact both here and abroad because education is Australia’s largest service export and New Zealand’s second largest. Recent statistics reveal that of all Australian higher education courses completed in 2016, the field of management and commerce accounts for 19% for domestic students and 55% for our international students. New Zealand has similar high statistics with 27% of students studying management and commerce courses. Of that 1 in 5 are international students. These large numbers and percentage of diverse cultures offers us rich exploration for teaching and learning but also numerous challenges in the way to tackle all 17 SDGs in the curriculum, research and partnerships.

You officially became an Established Chapter at your most recent Regional Meeting. Tell us a bit about it.

The 5th PRME Chapter Australia & New Zealand Forum took place at Deakin University, a PRME Champion School, in Melbourne early in December 2017. The theme of the meeting was ‘Inspire, Motivate, Engage, Act’ in regards to realising the Sustainable Development Goals. Over the course of the day we went through the different elements of the theme. We started by celebrating and sharing the growth we have had as a region over the past 10 years, congratulating Latrobe Business School and Griffith Business School in Australia and University of Waikato Management School in New Zealand who were among the first to sign as PRME Signatories.  We also signed the MOU with the PRME Secretariat, officially becoming an Established Chapter. Each school had a chance to present their achievements from 2017 and hopes for 2018 and to share key resources and opportunities. We also had a number individuals join us for parts of the day including Alice Cope, the Executive Director of UN Global Compact Australia, Anne Swear who is the Head of Corporate Sustainability at ANZ, Sue Noble the CEO of Volunteering Victoria, Giselle Weybrecht who is a Special Advisor to the PRME Secretariat, Sarah Goulding from the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade and Soyuma Gupta, a current student at Deakin. The discussions were focused on how Australia is moving forward with the SDGs and how the schools that form the chapter can be part of those discussions and actions moving forward. For a full summary of the meeting click here.

What are some of the challenges that schools in this part of the world are facing and some issues that are particularly relevant in relation to the SDG?

While our research stimulates innovation and delivers solutions to economic, social and demographic challenges facing our nations we need to work closer with industry and government to support SDGs realisation. Our textbook and classroom cases can be routine in using global examples, which are informative, but the challenge is to bring an understanding of the SDGs back to illustrations from our countries, enabling our students and academics to understand just how global these goals are.

An example of this in particular pertains to human rights. In the latest Amnesty International 2016-2017 report, Australia’s commitment to human rights fails when it comes to our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, especially children abuse and deaths in custody (SDG 10.2, 16.2). Asylum seeking processes and procedures (SDG 1.4, 10.7), disability rights (SDG 1.2, 10.2) and counter-terror measures (SDG 10.3), all of which put us on the Human Rights Watch List for the third successive year in 2016. New Zealand has similar Indigenous Maori challenges along with high rates of violence against women and girls (SDG 5.1, 5.2) and children poverty rates (SDG 1.2). Ensuring these issues are communicated and mapped across all disciplines in the management and commerce field requires raising awareness, conducting audit type processes alongside developing a mechanism for resource sharing.

What’s planned for the chapter moving forward?

The SDGs provide us with a framework for industry, civil society and government collaboration. In Australia, the Voluntary National Review (VNR) on SDG progress is underway with the report due mid-2018. It is essential that the higher education sector and in particular PRME AUSNZ contribute to this report and continue to build relationships for future research.

As an Established Chapter, we are forming a steering committee that will focus on the priority areas of student engagement activities and embedding SDGs in the curriculum, building communities of practices within Faculty and across university/universities, mapping SDGs across curriculum and research and research and cross sector collaboration.

A Selection of MOOCs on Sustainability and Ethics for January 2018 (Part 2 of 2)

Every year there is an increase in the number of MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) available on sustainability topics. These courses are available for free online and open to anyone with an interest in the topic, lasting between three and fourteen weeks and taking three to eight hours per week to complete. Below is a selection of such courses starting in January 2018, listed by topic, from PRME as well as some non-signatory schools. Click here to view Part 1.

Human Rights and Development: This course explores the topic of development based on human rights and social justice perspectives It looks at the ideology behind international aid programmes and looks at development from both Indigenous and African perspectives. Curtin University – starts April 2 2018.

Human Rights Activism, Advocacy and Change: This course explores the role of social movements, advocacy groups and activism in bringing about social change. Curtin University – starts February 5 2018.

International Human Rights Law: This course explores how an individual’s human rights are protected from both public and private power by international laws. UCL – starts February 1 2018.

Cities The Past, Present and Future of Urban Life: This course explores what makes cities energising, amazing, challenging and perhaps humanity’s greatest invention. Harvard University – starts February 15.

Greening the Economy Sustainable Cities: This course explores sustainable cities as engines for greening the economy. It places cities in the context of sustainable urban transformation and climate change. Lund University – starts January 15 2018.

Re-Enchanting the City-Designing the Human Habitat: This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary nature of city making. It will use the example of central Park in Sydney to explore the interdependencies of the professionals at play: urban design, architecture, construction management, planning, landscape, interior design etc. UNSW – starts

Sustainable Fashion: This course explores the fashion industry which is valued at more than $4 trillion USD and employs over 60 million people. It is also the second most polluting industry in the world. Fordham Gabelli School of Business – available now.

Chocolate and Sustainability: This course provides an overview of sustainability issues across the cocoa supply chain, from the farmers to the consumer. TCHO – available now.

Climate Change: This course explores how climate change will affect us, why we should care about it and what solutions we can employ. The course requires 2-4 hours of study per week depending on the student. Macquarie University – starts January 8th 2018.

Planning for Climate Change in African Cities: This course provides the foundation for understanding a city’s exposure and sensitivity to climate change and how cities manage these impacts in the face of growing uncertainty. Multiple stakeholders – Starts now.

Making Sense of Climate Science Denial: The course explores what the controversy and debate is around climate change denial and helps individuals respond to it. University of Queensland – starts January 9 2018.

Climate Change Mitigation in Developing Countries: This course challenges learners to consider how one might lift societies out of poverty while also mitigating greenhouse gas emissions. It explores the inherent complexity of developing country governments wanting to grow their economics in a climate friendly way. University of Cape Town – starts January 22 2017.

Climate Justice Lessons From the Global South: This course helps learners to understand how we can balance human needs with caring for the planet with a focus on the Global South. UNESCO – starts now.

Contemporary Issues in Ocean Governance: This course considers the nature of how the world’s oceans are regulated. It will go through how ocean governance has evolved through time and how it actually works. University of Wollongong – starts January 8th 2018

 

Agriculture and the World We Live in: This course explores the world’s populations and the crucial role of agriculture in feeding the steadily increasing number of people. Massey University – starts January 8th 2018.

Discover Best Practice Farming for a Sustainable 2050: This course explores best practice farming for the future, how to start implementing these strategies now wile making sure it is still profitable. University of Western Australia – starts January 8 2018.

Ecosystem Services A Method for Sustainable Development: This course explore ecosystem services, a way of thinking about, and evaluating, the goods and services provided by nature that contribute to the well-being of humans. University of Geneva – starts January 8 2018.

Ethics and Law in Data Analytics: Analytics and AI are powerful tools that have real-world outcomes. Learn how to apply practical, ethical and legal constructs and scenarios so that you can be an effective analytics professional. Seattle University with Microsoft – starts January 1 2018.

Environmental Challenges Scarcity and Conflict in Natural Environment: This course explores war and conflict and how it can severely disrupt the governance of the environment with impacts on both people and the environment. University of Leeds – starts January 10 2018.

Power and Responsibility: Doing Philosophy with Superheroes: Superheros in movies and comics embrace truth and justice, peace rather than war and combat prejudice. This course uses superhoes as a way of interpreting key philosophical ideas – metaphysical and epistemology, social and political philosophy, ethics, philosophy of mind and much more. Smithsonian – starts January 16 2018.

The Science and Practice of Sustainable Development: This course explores the science and policies that drive sustainable development and how to achieve the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals. University of Queensland – self paced.

Become a Sustainable Business Change Agent: This series of courses is for anyone who would like to improve how their company or organisation impacts the environment, people and communities. It will introduce them to some of the key concepts and tools of sustainable business and teach them how to be effective change agents. University of Colorado – starts January 1 2018.

Becoming a Changemaker Introduction to Social Innovation: This course is for anyone who is interested in making a difference. It explores the complex problems that surround us and how to start thinking about solutions. University of Cape Town – starts January 8 2018.

 

And a few extras…

 

Teaching Historical Inquiry with Objects: Through explanation, demonstration, and dynamic examples, the course offers teachers practical ideas for how to entice students to craft complex and incisive questions: think critically about primary and secondary sources, form and support their opinions with evidence and communicate their conclusions in ways that wil prepare them to be engaged citizens of the world. Although this course is aimed at high school teachers, many of the tools could be of use within some business school courses as a way of introducing sustainability concepts. Smithsonian – self paced.

Selling Ideas: How to Influence Others and Get your Message To Catch On: This course explores how you can use social media and word of mouth to spread your message. It also provides a step-by-step guide on how to get anything to catch on by looking at what makes ideas memorable and messages stick. Wharton – starts January 8 2018.

 

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