2016 Good Practices in Responsible Management Education (Part 1)

It is once again it’s time for PRiMEtime’s year-end review. 2016 was another exciting year with a lot of innovative new initiatives and approaches at business schools around the world embedding responsible leadership and sustainability into their programmes. PRiMEtime provides an extensive and growing database of examples from schools around the world on how to embed sustainability, ethics and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) into management education as well as tips on how to move forward.

This year, 60 new articles were posted featuring over 143 examples from more than 65 schools in 38 countries. In this 2-part year-end post we review the examples featured this year, organized roughly around the SDGs, and what we have to look forward to next year. (Click on the links to read the full article).

SDG1SDG2SDG3The Hong Kong Polytechnic University has developed an interdisciplinary collaboration between the Business School and the Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, call the Wellness Clinic. It provides preventive care programmes designed, promoted, administered and implemented by students. IEDC-Bled School of Management partnered with members of the UN Global Compact Local Slovenia to organize workshops around the theme of “Health promotion in the workplace as part of the corporate social responsibility and sustainable business development’.

For one week in March, EADA Business School’s campus transforms into a model refugee course where students taking the Managing Humanitarian Emergencies elective learn about the main components required to respond to humanitarian emergencies and extreme situations in general.



La Trobe Business School (Australia), ISAE (Brazil), Audencia Nantes School of Management (France) and Hanken School of Economics (Finland) founded CR3+ Network, a new program that provides a supportive platform to build international collaboration and enables the four schools to work together to build capacity in responsible management education. In the USA, Western Michigan University (USA) partnered with Christ University in Bagalore in India to create an experiential experience to engage students in sustainability discussions in India. Reutlingen University in Germany shared their experiences with the Ethikum Certificate awarded to students who complete a number of special experiences and courses during their time at university. Hult International Business School shared their experiences integrating the SDGs into the core Business and Global Society course. Hult International Business School and Ashridge Business School also shared their experiences integrating the Sustainable Development Goals into their PRME Sharing Information on Progress Report. The University of St. Gallen and oikos work together to offer the PhD Fellowship Programme, a unique opportunity to support international PhD students writing their thesis on sustainability in economics or management.

PRiMEtime also explored a range of MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) available on sustainability topics. These courses are free online and open to anyone with an interest in the topic. A series of posts provided an overview of the MOOCs available in the Spring (Part 1 and Part 2) and summer (Part 1 and Part 2).



The American University of Beirut’s University for Senior Programme aims to redefine the role of older people in society by providing them opportunities to remain intellectually challenged and socially connected through a range of lectures, study groups, educational travel programmes, campus life and intergenerational activities. The American University of Beirut also paired up with Citi to provide crucial support and mentoring for female entrepreneurs in Lebanon and the MENA region with the goal of increasing their numbers significantly. Altis Postgraduate School of Business and Society in Italy introduced us to E4Impact, a special programme aimed at training a new class of African leaders who will be able to create jobs in the sustainability sector in their country.



Ryerson University (Canada) designed a unique interdisciplinary programme that brings together faculty from all of the university’s six department called the Environmental Applied Science and Management (EnSciMan) with a focus on environmental management. In Italy, the University of Bologna’s Launch Pad aims to leverage the know-how of the hundreds of PhDs and post-docs studying at the university to facilitate its transformation into valuable products and services, many focused on social and environmental topics. PRiMEtime also looked at a range of global student networks engaged in sustainability that are active within and across business schools.



Antwerp Management School’s ID@Work research programme aims to support organisations in attracting, developing and retaining employees with an intellectual disability. The Australian Indigenous Mentoring Experience at the University of Wollongong is an educational programme that supports Indigenous students through high school and into university, employment or further education. Also in Australia, Deakin University has been exploring how to encourage and train more Indigenous Australians to become accountants (currently of the more than 180,000 Australian professional accounting body members, only 30 identify as Indigenous). The Northwest Aboriginal Canadians Entrepreneurs Programme at the University of Victoria Gustavson School of Business is a partnership between several organisations including regional and provision government to offer first class entrepreneurial learning to the Indigenous people of Northwest British Columbia with the aim to enhance the self sufficiency and full economic participation of Indigenous people

How to Engage Students Around the SDGs – Antwerp Management School

ams-sdg-student-ambassador-tshirtOver the past three years, Antwerp Management School has stepped up its efforts to implement the PRME principles. Apart from having been a Signatory since 2012, they also hosted the Belgium Global Compact Network Chapter. Sustainability is a key focus area of their school, in particular what they refer to as societal consciousness of students in relation to sustainability.

I recently spoke with Eva Geluk, part of the team at BASF Deloitte Elia Chair on Sustainability and Manager of the Competence Centre Corporate Responsibility at Antwerp Management School about one of their newest programmes, the SDG Student Ambassador Campaign, that aims to engage students in sustainability discussions and, in particular, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG).

What is the SDG Student Ambassador Campaign?

At AMS, we aim to empower students with the necessary knowledge, skills and reflection on societal challenges that will not only help them to develop their own perspective on corporate responsibilities, but also help them by turning these into future business opportunities. As the SDGs are gaining increasingly visibility in the world of business and civil society at large we thought it was time to promote the Goals within our student community and empower them with the necessary knowledge to challenge their peers and faculty. Worldwide her Majesty Queen Mathilde of Belgium is one of the official SDG Ambassadors on global level.

Every year all of our students participate in a one-day programme consisting of an introduction to sustainability in the morning and an interactive and fun experiment in the afternoon. The morning lectures are on ‘Sustainable business = business’, followed by two interactive sessions on ‘Cultures of sustainability’ and ‘The evolutionary basis of sustainable behavior’. The afternoon session is an experiment through which students experienced (un)sustainability in an interactive, integral, and original way.

This year during the programme we launched the SDG Student Ambassador Campaign initiative looking for 16 Student Ambassadors – it is a voluntary initiative on top of their day-to-day curricula work. As there is no course incentive for them it is purely involvement based upon their own intrinsic motivation illustrating that this generation is not only aware of a changing world but also wants to actively contribute to it.

What are the key features of the programme and how does it work?

We see the creation of SDG Student Ambassadors not only as a means to promote the Goals within our own schools, both with fellow students and with faculty that teaches on their programs, but also as a means to further empower our students to critically assess the role of the Goals in management education. After all it is them who will be going out into business once they finish their degree and become the leaders of tomorrow. The original idea was to create 16 SDG Student Ambassadors that would facilitate a workshop with companies committed to the SDGs for their fellow students. To our delight the interest was that great that we ended up with 54 SDG Student Ambassadors. This represents almost a third of our total student population in the Full Time Masters division.

This group of SDG Student Ambassadors will be provided with extra information and get the opportunity to participate in conferences and events organized around the different sustainability themes. The best project will also get a prize for their work and we will create visibility for them where we can during their academic year. They have all received a SDG training session provided by CIFAL Flanders – part of UNITAR training centers, based in Antwerp and focusing all its training activities on the SDGs.

What are some of the projects that the students will be involved in?

Because of the success of the programme, we adapted our approach by suggesting a few more projects and letting room for the creation of own initiatives by the students. The result is a multiple of diverse projects:

  • A project where students will conduct a workshop with different companies active on the SDGs for their fellow students
  • a project where students will conduct a workshop on the SDGs in local schools
  • a project that will look at the own footprint of the student community
  • a project that will work guerilla style drawing attention in creative ways to the goals by for example organizing flash mobs in different cities in Belgium
  • a project that will organize a debating night on the SDGs and invite relevant and inspiring speakers
  • a project that will identify documentaries on the different goals and organize a movie night with teaching questions attached to it so that they can be used in class too
  • and a project with Aim2Flourish where students will interview business leaders that started a company with the aim of doing good
  • and finally a project that will look at SDGs in reporting and a project that creates our own SDG You Tube channel

What have been some of the challenges? 

Managing the additional workload that the great interest by students to become a SDG Student Ambassador had created. But this is only a pleasure! It would help to have a fixed budget for this project hence the leverage internally that this project creates is so important!


The fact that we got 54 SDG Student Ambassadors instead of the 16 that we were hoping for was a massive success and gives us internal leverage to further promote not only the SDGs but PRME initiatives as a whole.

The fact that there is so much interest from the students is obviously very exciting. It gives not only hope about the next generation of young leaders understanding the importance of sustainable development in a business context but also fulfills our aim of empowering the students with knowledge and critical thinking that they can use with their peers, faculty and future employers. Also the fact that they are actively involved in finding own projects is exciting as it underlines the empowerment approach and shows that it is working. Thirdly, it has the potential to become an important internal leverage for putting even more focus and effort in implementing the PRME principles in all of our teaching, research and activities as almost a third of our students illustrated this much interest in the theme.

What advice would you have for other schools thinking of putting something similar into place?

Do not think too much about it but just do it. We launched it as an experiment, with only the only objective being having 16 student ambassadors and one project so being flexible in what comes at you and have internal support from above is also essential.

What’s next for the initiative?

Now all focus is on executing the different projects and raising awareness on them and the AMS SDG Student Ambassador campaign at large. Early spring we will evaluate and see how we can further build not only the student empowerment programme itself with the overall aim of getting ECTS points attached to it, but also the SDG Student Ambassador campaign and create continuity. Furthermore we would love to share our experiences and the outcome of the projects with other schools as much as possible.

Our approach to responsible management education is supported by the BASF Deloitte Elia Chair on Sustainability – a joint academic partnership by the faculty of applied economic science at the University of Antwerp and Antwerp Management School. For more read AMS’s SIP report.


How the Social Impact Festival at University of Western Australia Supports Global and Local Progress

img_7254-smlThe Sustainable Development Goals help us consider everything – from one person, to the university, to our cities – in a global context. They provide a robust yet accessible framework for learning about global progress. This is the focus of the work being done at the Centre for Social Impact at the University of Western Australia. Among their many programmes is their annual Social Impact Festival, an opportunity to bring together individuals and organisations who are deeply committed to making Western Australia a better place.

I spoke with Claire Stokes from the Centre for Social Impact at the University of Western Australia about this increasingly successful event.

What is the Social Impact Festival?

The Centre for Social Impact at The University of Western Australia (UWA) hosted the first Social Impact Festival in May 2015 – we call this ‘prototype 1’. It saw over 1,000 people attending events on the UWA Crawley campus focused on furthering social impact. When 2016 began, the team at the Centre for Social Impact UWA decided to take the festival into ‘prototype 2’ in July 2016. Katie Stubley (the other co-director) and myself started with a purpose and designed the event to fulfill that purpose. This included three primary aims: share and diffuse cutting-edge knowledge; strengthen and connect social impact networks; and increase our capacity to make WA better for all. We also identified many people, ideas, organisations and networks that have been deeply committed to making WA a more just, vibrant and better place for all. So a key element of the festival was bringing stories of social impact in WA to the surface to be celebrated and amplified.

What are the key features of the Festival and how does it work?

The concept of ‘social impact’ is so broad that we knew a regular conference format would not work. To see real change, we knew we had to reach audiences beyond those who had previously engaged with the Centre and in a variety of settings. The format was based roughly on a ‘fringe festival’: a diverse range of small, low-cost, and engaging events in a variety of venues so attendees could ‘create their own adventure’.

We turned to our postgraduate course – the Graduate Certificate in Social Impact – for a framework which gave us the following themes for the four key days of the festival:

  • Creating social impact: entrepreneurship, innovation & design
  • Demonstrating social impact: research, measurement & evaluation
  • Funding social impact: investment, philanthropy & ethical consumerism
  • Leading social impact: organisation, collaboration & systems

As a whole, the festival featured 34 events over 7 days in 16 venues around Perth. Individual event prices ranged from $0 to $30 and 15 events were free. More than 150 people and organisations contributed to the festival programme (including speakers, workshop facilitators, co-working space hosts, artists, performers, open house venues, and market stall-holders). Through the interactive ‘Stories from the Field’ events (21, 22, 26 & 27 July), 68 individual stories of social impact were shared. Twenty local ethical businesses featured in the Marketplace & Ethical Fashion Show (23 July), and 10 spaces and organisations featured on Social Impact Open House day (25 July).

What are/were your favourite parts of the festival?

Pitching events are always interesting, as they provide opportunities for real people and organisations to take action, as well as the chance to learn about investing and the local landscape. The Impact Seed Pitch Night on 26 July was no exception. Run by a new Perth-based organisation, Impact Seed, the event saw five investable social businesses pitch for investment to a packed auditorium of 120 people. It also featured a highly engaging keynote address from Bessi Graham (The Difference Incubator, Melbourne). Graham also sat on the judging panel with Paul Flatau (Centre for Social Impact UWA), Derek Gerrard (Innovation Bay), and Paul Bide (School for Social Entrepreneurs).

Two other standout events were the Festival Opening and Marketplace & Ethical Fashion Show. The Opening was a directed performance, mixing inspiring speech from Michael Chaney, Cassandra Goldie and Noel Nannup together with music, poetry, song and dance. The Marketplace & Ethical Fashion show held an atmostphere that was absolutely perfect for what we were trying to achieve. There was a modest amount of stalls – 20 in total – but every single person involved demonstrated deep passion and commitment to their cause. This also extended to an excitement in celebrating and helping each other on the day. Businesses represented included social enterprises, fair trade homewares, organic kombucha and tea, eco-garden services, ethical fashion, Aboriginal enterprises, and more. An estimated 300+ people attended the event and all stallholders reported they sold more than expected.

Although not an event, the ongoing co-working and collaboration space was another highlight. This provided ample opportunity for attendees of events throughout the festival to come early or stay afterwards to simply work, or meet other like-minded people and make new connections. The hosts of this space, Perth-based social innovators enkel, also ensured users of the space made the most of it by engaging with interesting activities such as mindfulness, story-telling, and more.

What impact does the festival aim to have/ already have?

We have already observed and heard about the immediate impact of the Festival. For instance, as one of the key aims was connecting people across sectors we were delighted to hear that almost 70% of attendees said they made new connections they intend to follow up with (or already have). That does not even take into account the connections made across the 150 contributors. We have also heard of some changes, or actions taken based on transformative experiences. For example, 26% of attendees to seek out formal education or training in fields linked to social impact. One person reported they have already chaired a board meeting and presented information from the Festival, leading the Board to review the organisation’s mission, objectives, strategies and how we can better measure our social impact.

Anecdotally, we have heard of many new connections and collaborations around Perth that resulted from the Festival, while other connections have strengthened or formalised. This is exactly the kind of impact we intended to create.

What advice would you have for other schools thinking of putting something similar into place?

Design with a purpose. That was the single-most important aspect of the festival and it resulted in an event that was not only successful in terms of numbers and engagement, but in the immediate impact it had, leaving everyone involved with the optimism and drive to create positive change.

What’s next?

We are synthesizing the huge amount of information that was drawn out during the festival – in the form of stories, ideas, presentations and feedback. Many of the resources presented or created throughout the festival can be found here: http://www.socialimpactfestival.org/resources/

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Engaging High School Students in Sustainable Business – San Francisco State University College of Business

ethics-classroom-SFUEngaging business school students in ethics and responsible business is important, but business schools can also play another important role to influence students before they even enter business school. Many, such as San Francisco State University’s College of Business in the US, are providing a range of programmes to expose high school students to these topics. This provides opportunities to not only introduce younger students to sustainability, but also to introduce them to the business school environment, and in the process engage current students, staff and faculty. I spoke with Denise Kleinrichert, Director of the Center for Ethical and Sustainable Business (CESB) at San Francisco State University College of Business about this initiative.

What is the High School Student Summer Sustainability Workshop?

The High School Summer Sustainability Workshop began as a collaboration between several faculty members and MBA students in which the Center for Ethical & Sustainable Business hosted a sustainable business workshop for high school students. The workshops started in 2011 with 12 students from private schools that came together for half days over a one week period. The success of this camp and its students’ enthusiasm encouraged the development of an ongoing project that would be expanded to include the San Francisco United School Districts’ 19 public high schools in 2012 and 2013,drawing up to 40 students each summer. After a two-year hiatus, a 2016 summer workshop is in the planning. The workshops are free to public high school juniors and seniors through application process, including teacher and parent recommendations/approvals. We receive some financial support for the learning materials, beverages and snacks for the week from a continuing relationship with a Bay Area bank through the support of one of our MBA alum.

What are the key features of the programme?

Key topics of the week include understanding human and business impacts on the environment, such as:

  • Access to and maintaining clean water, arable land, and clean air
  • Ecological footprints of individuals and businesses, life cycle analysis of durable products and their manufacturing, waste management and recycling
  • Understanding supply chain impacts from raw materials through product end-of-life
  • Closed loop production; consumer awareness and overconsumption impacts on the environment
  • Fair Trade practices and food sources
  • Technology and clothing industries and their environmental impacts
  • Social entrepreneurship practices and their positive impacts

Why have it? 

We hold these workshops because high school students are just starting to understand environmental impacts on the communities in which they live. We want to broaden their global perspectives of how business can effect positive outcomes. High school students also have so much fun and energy and so many ideas – it’s great to introduce them to a university campus environment.

How are current business students and faculty involved?

We have had strong support from MBA students and upper division business undergraduates who show an eagerness to get involved and help. The mentoring possibilities are valuable for both sets of students. We also now have alumni who want to continue their ongoing roles, and new alum eager to also give back to their campus and the local community by volunteering their time for this project. Faculty also volunteer their time and expertise for the development and leadership of this initiative.

What have been some of the challenges? Successes? 

We haven’t really had too many challenges, except for faculty travel or teaching that might conflict with leading the annual workshop each June. Also, due to the diverse community in which we are located, some parents do not have the language skills to understand printed materials, such as approval forms or materials we provide about the programme. However, the successes are found in the connections we are able to make by bridging the high school to university experience through the students’ shared interest in sustainability.

What advice would you have for other schools thinking of putting something similar into place?

We wouldn’t be able to host this event without the strong support of the city school system’s administrative staff who oversee the science curriculum for all 19 high schools. They are the ones on the front lines promoting our workshop, securing student applications and attendance approval forms from parents. Also, at least one or two Science teachers/Administrators attend every day of the workshop to assist in managing 40 students.

What are 2 or 3 other initiatives at your school you are particularly proud of in this area from the Center for Ethical and Sustainable Business?

CESB hosts an annual Business Ethics Week each November (just celebrated our 10th year in 2015) that includes a wide variety of out-of-classroom activities and events focused on business ethics topics, including corporate social responsibility, social entrepreneurship and sustainability. During Business Ethics Week, students attend campus events, such as speaker panels, film and documentary screenings, ethics debate competitions on case study solutions, and hands-on exercises with industry leaders. There are two to three events each day. Additionally, at least 50% of faculty integrate ethics-related topics or speakers into class lectures during that week.

CESB also hosts an ongoing series of full day industry-to-student Ethics & Compliance Workshops with cross-industry executive panels tackling trending ethics and compliance issues in healthcare, pharma, banking and finance, consulting, risk management, tech and privacy, and hospitality. These workshops discuss real world ethical challenges, case studies and strategies for issue analysis, successful mitigation, and employee training.


Global Student Networks Engaged in Sustainability in Management Education

Almost every business school now has at least one club on campus that aims to bring students interested in responsible leadership and sustainability together. Many of these clubs are part of global networks.

These campus clubs not only provide a space for interested students to meet, but are an important resource for sustainability faculty and staff champions working on embedding responsible leadership on campus. All of these clubs are engaged in bringing the Six Principles of PRME to campus in different ways.


Oikos is an international student-driven organization for sustainability in economics and management founded in 1987 in Switzerland. The organization focuses on embedding environmental and social perspectives in management and economic programmes and curriculum. There are over 1000 members in 40 oikos chapters around the world. Although the numbers may seem small, these students are very active and committed. The oikos Fellowship Programme offers students scholarships to research sustainability in economics and management. Oikos also has a joint initiative with GRLI called Commit (Change Of Management Education & Methods In Teaching) launched in 2015. Schools active in oikos include the University of St. Gallen and the Faculty of Economics and Management at Witten/Herdecke University.

Net ImpactNet Impact

Net Impact is a community of more than 80,000 students and professionals creating positive social and environmental change in the workplace and the world. The focus of Net Impact has shifted over the years from curriculum change to helping students find post-graduation jobs in the field of sustainability, therefore driving transformational change in the workplace. However, Net Impact clubs on campus are still active in the curriculum change space and regularly publish Business as Unusual, a guide rating graduate programs’ integration of social and environmental themes. There are three types of Net Impact chapters: undergraduate, graduate and professional.Net Impact also has an active alumni group. Schools with gold status Net Impact Clubs include American University of Beirut, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, and Duquesne University.


Enactus, formerly known as Students for Free Enterprise, is a community of student, academic and business leaders committed to using the power of entrepreneurial action to transform lives and shape a better, more sustainable future. Students, organized into clubs on university campuses, work on projects with their local communities. There are 70,000 club members in 36 countries. Local Enactus clubs organize annual national competitions to showcase how students are transforming lives and enabling progress through entrepreneurial action, with winners going on to represent their country at the Enactus World Cup. Schools with an active Enactus club include Hertfordshire Business School and Thammasat Business School.


AIESEC is a global platform made up of students under the age of 30 interested in world issues, leadership and management. Their goal is to prepare responsible and entrepreneurial young leaders by providing practical leadership experience to students. The organization empowers students to take part in volunteer opportunities locally and abroad and provides links to opportunities for internships. The organization spans 126 countries and territories and all aspects of its operations are managed by students and recent graduates. AIESEC also has a strong alumni network. Schools with AIESEC clubs include Beedie School of Business, University of Wellington, and the George Washington University.


Using Pitch Competitions to Develop Sustainability Skills and Businesses

Faso-Soap-GSVCMany business students enter their degree programs hoping that, one day, they will become entrepreneurs, starting and growing their own businesses. In addition to a range of courses and electives focused on entrepreneurship, there has also been a significant increase in the number of local and global pitch competitions. At a pitch competition, teams of students can pitch their business ideas with the opportunity to win significant cash prizes and investments to kick-start their businesses. Win or lose, the competitions allow for important mentorship, advisory support, opportunities to network with important people in the industry, including investors and instant validation for a business idea.

There are several business schools around the world offering such opportunities, including, but not limited to, the following:

The Global Social Venture Competition, based at the University of California, Berkeley, provides aspiring entrepreneurs with mentoring, PR, and $50,000 in prizes to transform their ideas into businesses that will have positive real-world impact. Teams are evaluated over three rounds: at their school, at the regional semi-finals and at the global finals. At each stage, they get support and feedback from local experts and social entrepreneurs. Last year, GSVC received more than 500 entries from 40 countries. This year, the finals will take place in Thailand at Thammasat Business School. This will be the first time the finals are held outside the US.

Morgan Stanley and Kellogg School of Management, along with international partners INSEAD and the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, created the Sustainable Investing Challenge. This pitch competition for graduate students focuses on developing institutional-quality investment vehicles that seek positive environmental or social impact and competitive financial returns. The winners of last year’s challenge formed their own start-up in the world of conservation finance based on their winning entry involving the creation of Forest Resilience Bonds in the US. This year, the deadline for applying is February 24th, 2016 and ten finalist teams will gather in Hong Kong in April 2016 to pitch their financial investment proposals for specific social or environmental projects. Last year, 127 teams entered, representing 78 schools from 20 countries.

The Intel Global Challenge at University of California, Berkeley, is the world’s largest and most prestigious technology entrepreneurship competition, attracting more than 20,000 young innovators and entrepreneurs from 60 countries. Finalists present their work to experienced entrepreneurs and venture capitalists at regional and final competitions as they vie for $100,000 in prizes. The winners are considered those that have the most potential to make a positive impact on society.

The Sustainability Innovation Student Challenge Award was launched by Dow in 2009 to promote forward-thinking in social and environmental responsibility. The challenge engages students from 18 universities around the world to come up with solutions that are interdisciplinary in nature, represent innovative thinking, and have the potential for solving world challenges in alignment with the spirit of Dow’s Sustainability Goals. The winning university receives $10,000 USD in prizes.

The Lee Kuan Yew Global Business Plan Competition at Singapore Management University is aimed at undergraduate students from around the world who, if chosen, stand to win up to $60,000 USD in cash, prizes and business development opportunities. Teams submit a business plan that goes through preliminary and semi-final rounds before making it to the final round in Singapore. There is also a cash award granted to the “Most Promising Young Entrepreneur.” Last year’s competition saw 121 business plans from 336 students representing 28 countries. Over time, there has been an increase in the number of plans that relate to sustainability.

London Business School and the University College of London launched the Cleantech Challenge. Teams of students from around the world develop their clean technology business ideas through a three-stage competition that runs from November through April. They receive guidance, feedback and mentorship from industry professionals throughout the Challenge. Ten finalist teams compete in a live “Boot Camp” final in London for a chance to win GBP 10,000 in cash.

The Hult Prize Foundation is a start-up accelerator for budding young social entrepreneurs emerging from universities worldwide. The prize, awarded annually, aims to inspire the creation and launch of the most compelling social business ideas. Winners receive USD 1 million in seed capital, as well as mentorship and advice from the international business community. Last year’s winner was National Chengchi University from Taiwan. The 2016 challenge looks at crowded urban spaces, and poses the following question: can we build sustainable, scalable and fast growing social enterprises that double the income of 10 million people residing in crowded urban spaces by better connecting people, goods, services and capital?

Does your school have a pitch competition? Share the details in the comments below.

Management Education and the United Nations

As an initiative established by the United Nations, PRME provides a range of opportunities for signatories to engage with a range of programmes throughout the UN system. This includes the wider “UN family” made up of the UN and its many affiliated programmes (e.g. UNDP, UNEP), funds (e.g. UNICEF), and specialised agencies (e.g. ILO, IMF, World Bank) each working on a different subset of sustainability issues globally and locally.

For example, signatories are invited and encouraged to engage in cross-programme projects relating to education and sustainable development including:

SDGSustainable Development Goals (SDG)

On 26 September 2015, all 193 Member States of the United Nations adopted a plan for achieving a better future for all—laying out a path over the next 15 years to end extreme poverty, fight inequality and injustice, and protect our planet. At the heart of “Agenda 2030” are 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and 169 related targets that address the most important economic, social, environmental, and governance challenges of our time. These goals will help guide national government priorities, however it is the private sector that will be key to the success of each goal—through responsible business operations, new business models, investment, innovation and technology, and collaboration. For companies, successful implementation of the SDGs will strengthen the enabling environment for doing business and building markets around the world. Overall, the SDGs represent an unprecedented opportunity for business and academic institutions to align their own sustainability goals with goals for the broader society. Although the SDGs don’t officially begin until January 2016, now is the time to start exploring how to align curricula, projects, research, and partnerships and raising awareness about the goals on campus. For business updates on the SDGs, click here, for updates from PRME, click here, and stay tuned to PRiMEtime.

HESIHigher Education Sustainability Initiative (HESI)

HESI was created by a consortium of UN entities (UNESCO, UNDESA, UNEP, Global Compact, PRME, and UNU) in the run up to the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20). Through HESI, higher education institutions commit to teach sustainable development concepts in their core curricula, conduct research on sustainable development issues, green their campuses and support sustainability efforts in the communities in which they are embedded. Although not specifically focused on management education, many PRME signatories are engaged.

The HESI network comes together regularly, most recently in October 2015 in Paris to discuss Higher Education for Climate Change Action. The event provided an opportunity to:

  • take stock of progress made since Rio+20 by sharing best practices and lessons learnt,
  • discuss the roles and responsibilities of higher education institutions in contributing to business and technological innovation around climate change adaptation and mitigation, and
  • encourage new or enhanced commitments, particularly around the facilitation of academic and scientific inputs into the formulation of climate policies.

The meeting resulted in the formulation of a message and a set of policy recommendations to be presented to the UNFCC Secretariat at COP21 in December 2015 in Paris.

UNESCO Global Action Plan on Education for Sustainable Development

gap-esd_logoBuilding on the momentum and increasing importance of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) beyond the International Decade for Sustainable Development (2005-2015), the Global Action Plan (GAP) seeks to generate and scale-up concrete actions arou
nd ESD in all levels and areas of education and learning
to accelerate progress towards sustainable development. In order to do this five priority action areas have been identified; mainstreaming ESD into educational and sustainable development policies, integrating sustainability principles into education and training settings, building capacities of educators and trainers, empowering and mobilising youth, and accelerating sustainable solutions at the local level. For more on the GAP, click here.

UNESCO (the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation) coordinates a wide range of local, regional, and global projects around education for all, at all levels, and in all areas. For more, visit en.unesco.org. One of these projects is the Global Business Coalition for Education, which brings the business community together to accelerate progress in delivering quality education for all of the world’s children and youth.

For more on UN-related educational programmes and opportunities to engage, keep an eye out for notices in the PRME Newsletter.

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