2016 Good Practices in Responsible Management Education (Part 1)

It is once again it’s time for PRiMEtime’s year-end review. 2016 was another exciting year with a lot of innovative new initiatives and approaches at business schools around the world embedding responsible leadership and sustainability into their programmes. PRiMEtime provides an extensive and growing database of examples from schools around the world on how to embed sustainability, ethics and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) into management education as well as tips on how to move forward.

This year, 60 new articles were posted featuring over 143 examples from more than 65 schools in 38 countries. In this 2-part year-end post we review the examples featured this year, organized roughly around the SDGs, and what we have to look forward to next year. (Click on the links to read the full article).

SDG1SDG2SDG3The Hong Kong Polytechnic University has developed an interdisciplinary collaboration between the Business School and the Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, call the Wellness Clinic. It provides preventive care programmes designed, promoted, administered and implemented by students. IEDC-Bled School of Management partnered with members of the UN Global Compact Local Slovenia to organize workshops around the theme of “Health promotion in the workplace as part of the corporate social responsibility and sustainable business development’.

For one week in March, EADA Business School’s campus transforms into a model refugee course where students taking the Managing Humanitarian Emergencies elective learn about the main components required to respond to humanitarian emergencies and extreme situations in general.

 

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La Trobe Business School (Australia), ISAE (Brazil), Audencia Nantes School of Management (France) and Hanken School of Economics (Finland) founded CR3+ Network, a new program that provides a supportive platform to build international collaboration and enables the four schools to work together to build capacity in responsible management education. In the USA, Western Michigan University (USA) partnered with Christ University in Bagalore in India to create an experiential experience to engage students in sustainability discussions in India. Reutlingen University in Germany shared their experiences with the Ethikum Certificate awarded to students who complete a number of special experiences and courses during their time at university. Hult International Business School shared their experiences integrating the SDGs into the core Business and Global Society course. Hult International Business School and Ashridge Business School also shared their experiences integrating the Sustainable Development Goals into their PRME Sharing Information on Progress Report. The University of St. Gallen and oikos work together to offer the PhD Fellowship Programme, a unique opportunity to support international PhD students writing their thesis on sustainability in economics or management.

PRiMEtime also explored a range of MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) available on sustainability topics. These courses are free online and open to anyone with an interest in the topic. A series of posts provided an overview of the MOOCs available in the Spring (Part 1 and Part 2) and summer (Part 1 and Part 2).

 

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The American University of Beirut’s University for Senior Programme aims to redefine the role of older people in society by providing them opportunities to remain intellectually challenged and socially connected through a range of lectures, study groups, educational travel programmes, campus life and intergenerational activities. The American University of Beirut also paired up with Citi to provide crucial support and mentoring for female entrepreneurs in Lebanon and the MENA region with the goal of increasing their numbers significantly. Altis Postgraduate School of Business and Society in Italy introduced us to E4Impact, a special programme aimed at training a new class of African leaders who will be able to create jobs in the sustainability sector in their country.

 

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Ryerson University (Canada) designed a unique interdisciplinary programme that brings together faculty from all of the university’s six department called the Environmental Applied Science and Management (EnSciMan) with a focus on environmental management. In Italy, the University of Bologna’s Launch Pad aims to leverage the know-how of the hundreds of PhDs and post-docs studying at the university to facilitate its transformation into valuable products and services, many focused on social and environmental topics. PRiMEtime also looked at a range of global student networks engaged in sustainability that are active within and across business schools.

 

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Antwerp Management School’s ID@Work research programme aims to support organisations in attracting, developing and retaining employees with an intellectual disability. The Australian Indigenous Mentoring Experience at the University of Wollongong is an educational programme that supports Indigenous students through high school and into university, employment or further education. Also in Australia, Deakin University has been exploring how to encourage and train more Indigenous Australians to become accountants (currently of the more than 180,000 Australian professional accounting body members, only 30 identify as Indigenous). The Northwest Aboriginal Canadians Entrepreneurs Programme at the University of Victoria Gustavson School of Business is a partnership between several organisations including regional and provision government to offer first class entrepreneurial learning to the Indigenous people of Northwest British Columbia with the aim to enhance the self sufficiency and full economic participation of Indigenous people

Integrating the SDGs into the Business and Global Society Course – Hult International Business School

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In response to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG), schools around the world are stepping up their activities, embedding the SDGs into their strategies and, most importantly, their curriculum. Last week we learnt more about how Hult International Business School and Ashridge Business School embedded the SDGs into their reporting. This week I spoke with Joanne Lawrence from Hult International Business School again to look specifically at how they integrated the SDGs into one of their core courses.

What is the Business and Global Society Course?

The Business and Global Society course is a required course in the MBA and EMBA programmes at Hult International Business School. Students are first introduced to the “big picture’ of macro-economics (e.g., movement of labor, capital and the role of government) and the global issues (risks, impact) such as those addressed at the World Economic Forum. Against this backdrop, the Ten Principles of the UN Global Compact are introduced as a potential universal ‘code of conduct’ for business, along with the SDGs as potential opportunities. To address these global issues, the tools and skills that are interwoven into the course include analytical and systems thinking, stakeholder engagement, and collaboration.

Why introduce the SDGs in the course?

One of the basic questions in economics has been, why do the rich countries seem to get richer, and despite trillions in aid, the poor remain poor? And, as we move through the 21st century, the growing gap between rich and poor has been identified as one of the greatest threat to world security and prosperity.

If companies are going to continue to thrive, they are going to need skilled employees and educated consumers. The pursuit of the SDGs is not just morally right but economically essential.

The SDGs are about bringing the majority of the world—the ‘other’ 6 billion people – into the economy. Addressing the SDGs and business growth and economic stability are integrated.

To be good business leaders is going to require thinking more in systems – understanding how to think about unintended consequences of their actions, how to work more closely with governments, NGOs, and other non-business players.

Everything is interconnected. That is why macro-economics and the UN Global Compact’s Ten Principles intersect. To attract investment, governments need to crack down on bribery. To increase their labor force, companies need to help their employees develop skills. The roles between players are converging. Governments need business resources, business needs government’s access, both need the trust that NGOs bring.

What are some of the ways that the SDGs are incorporated into the course?

Students are asked to select one of the 17 Goals, then to slice it into a manageable chunk, and then ideally within a specific [geographic] place. They consider which industry/company might be appropriate to take the lead as the nodal organization. i.e., which firm makes sense? So, for example, if we look at access to education as a goal, and we think about the need that tech companies have for highly skilled workers in future, is there a way that tech companies can partner with governments to create programmes that build the skills they will need? And at the same time improve the incomes of these new workers, who then become consumers?

The idea is that fulfilling these goals is not about charity. It is about creating a healthier, more prosperous society through enabling people to improve themselves. The proposals need to make business sense. They need to engage the right players – business, government, NGOs and — create an eco-system that benefits each.

I am impressed every year with the creativity students exhibit, and how they get the ‘systems’ piece. We’ve had students addressing how to re-integrate FARC members into society through training; how to provide access to water through introduction of new systems; how to scale a local enterprise in Ghana building bikes of bamboo by partnering with a multi-national corporation; how to improve well-meaning projects of corporations like Coca-Cola to be more effective in rural communities… the list goes on!

Any challenges?

The biggest challenge – and the one I seek to be sure the students are getting –

is that this is not charity. Charity doesn’t work. This is about business partnering with governments, NGOs, etc.to create economic inclusion,which in the end benefits both. A prosperous, stable society is good for business, and business is good for creating that stability. In the end, whether you believe in the moral argument or not, it does make economic sense.

Successes?

Over the years, I have watched as doubting MBAs walk in wondering why they are being required to take a course called ‘Business and Global Society’ as a core course in a one-year MBA programme. It means Hult is saying this course is as important as Finance, Marketing, etc.

At the start of the course, I ask “What is the purpose of business?” Inevitably, they will say ‘to make money’. When I challenge them: but how? They are at a loss- they talk about lowering costs, etc.

At the end of the course, I ask again. Now I am getting different responses, more in line with what I hope they come to realize, i.e., in the end, the companies who make the most money and endure are the ones who serve society best.

It is very rewarding to see the shift, and it also speaks to this generation’s higher sense of purpose: they realize they can succeed by actually having a social impact. They do not have to choose. It is not either/ or, but and.

Are there other classes where students have the chance to explore the SDGs? For example your Social Innovation elective that worked with UNDP staff)?

I also teach Social Innovation as an elective, which takes the Business and Global Society course one step further. In the past two years, as part of this course, I have also worked with UNDP in several countries to identify a challenge, and ask the students to come up with some resolutions. Last year, students were challenged to come up with projects to help with the crisis in Yemen, such as how to engage women in creating social enterprises to generate income despite all the conflict surrounding them. The engagement with UNDP Yemen led to some students being asked to continue working with them to expand their ideas as well as me doing a seminar with young aspiring social entrepreneurs in Yemen via Skype.

Other projects include creating a business opportunity for women across the Arab States that would respect their cultural traditions of remaining in the home even as they allowed them to earn an income, or starting a business in Haiti that would generate jobs beyond tourism that would lead to more sustainable livelihoods. The student solutions were creative, respectful and linked players in ways that did create wealth-generating eco-systems.

Next steps?

Hult’s students are truly global—more than 120 countries represented. These students come from many of the countries where the SDGs are so critical. Our students are literally on the ground — they know what needs to happen.

For me, I’d like to provide them with the ability to implement their life changing ideas, perhaps by working with corporations specifically on the SDGs. Wouldn’t that be a great integration of Global Compact and PRME?

Advice for other schools thinking of doing something similar?

Do it! Business in the 21st century is not separate from the SDGS.

Business needs to address the risks the SDGs pose if not fulfilled. But there is also a huge opportunity for success by addressing them. We need to have the next generation of leaders focused on solving real problems for real people — not just product extensions for the privileged few, but products that work for the masses.

I believe that is the proper role of the business school: to develop global leaders of integrity, courage and purpose, who are capable of building organizations that solve problems plaguing society, improve livelihoods and lives.

In the end, that has always been the role of business: to solve problems that benefit society and move us forward.

 

Business and Business Schools Working Together at the Local Level (Part 2)

Screen Shot 2016-07-19 at 20.50.41Goal 17 of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) focuses on revitalising global partnerships for sustainable development. Two key stakeholders already working on issues relating to the SDGs are PRME and the United Nations Global Compact. Both groups operate as a network of networks, with local offices focusing on rooting both the Principles of PRME and of the Global Compact within different national, regional, cultural and linguistic contexts. Together they can have a significant influence at the local level.

In fact, business schools and companies are increasingly working together to further sustainability goals within different national contexts as well as facilitating outreach learning, policy dialogue and collective action. Partnerships between Global Compact Local Networks and PRME signatories  have been, and increasingly will be, an important tool in moving the sustainable development agenda forward.

For the next couple of weeks we will feature a very small selection of some of the many ways that these two groups can and are working together. In Part I, we looked at how business schools are working with Global Compact offices locally. Here we look at how business schools are promoting and providing training around the Ten Principles of the Global Compact.

Promoting the Global Compact

  • Raising awareness about the Global Compact: The Universidad Del Pacifico in Peru organizes a yearly “Support Week for Global Compact.” During this week, students and teachers from the different faculties present their research and projects related to the Six Principles for Responsible Management Education and the Ten Principles of the Global Compact. Global Compact companies participate in the event as well. In Korea, Kyung Hee University School of Management regularly organises field trips where students have the opportunity to visit companies that are part of the UN Global Compact Network Korea. During these trips they have a chance to see the company’s sustainability work.
  • Engaging students in the Global Compact: Students involved in the undergraduate internship programme at the University of Wollongong Faculty of Business in Australia are required to focus on the Ten Principles of the Global Compact at their workplace as part of their assessment. Internships are arranged with corporate partners who are also part of the Global Compact and have a strong focus on sustainability, such as Westpac and National Australia Bank..
  • Promoting the Global Compact to academic institutions: As an early signatory to the Global Compact, Ivey Business School in Canada is leveraging its extensive publishing case collection by matching up the cases with the Ten Principles of the Global Compact. You can now search for cases related to the different Principles.
  • Integrating the Principles into teaching: Instituto Superior de Educacion Administracion y Desarollo in Spain is taking a lead in a project involving the PRME Chapter Iberian, looking at indicators to implement Six Principles of PRME into business schools, including the Ten Principles of the Global Compact and the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. The University of New England in Australia annually monitors their courses to ensure that they address the social, governance and environmental objectives of the Global Compact.

Training for Global Compact Companies

Business schools are increasingly tapping into opportunities to work with Global Compact Local Networks and companies to provide needed training and raise awareness around the Global Compact Principles and their application. For example:

  • Training around specific issues for UNGC: Several years ago, Copenhagen Business School initiated a Board Programme with the UN Global Compact that aimed to support boards of directors to effectively oversee and help drive their company’s sustainability strategy. This is now part of the UN Global Compact offerings. In the UK, Aston Business School provides human rights training for companies through their Global Compact Local Network.
  • Assisting with the integration of the Global Compact generally: Since 2013, Universidad EAFIT and the Colombian multinational SAGEN have worked together on an initiative called “First Contact Pilot Programme” to promote sustainability under Global Compact parameters amongst ISAGEN suppliers. They also designed a Global Compact programme for Responsible Suppliers, a 10-hour programme focused on the Ten Principles of the Global Compact open to managers from companies in their Local Network. Registered participants received accreditation for participating.
  • Providing specialized diplomas: Externado University Management Faculty offers a diploma in Business and Human Rights, in collaboration with the local network, aimed at deepening participants’ understanding on human rights and their relationship to business. The university also invited small and medium sized companies to take part in their First Steps in CSR programme, also in partnership with the Global Compact Local Network. More than 250 SMEs have participated in this programme.

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Using Pitch Competitions to Develop Sustainability Skills and Businesses

Faso-Soap-GSVCMany business students enter their degree programs hoping that, one day, they will become entrepreneurs, starting and growing their own businesses. In addition to a range of courses and electives focused on entrepreneurship, there has also been a significant increase in the number of local and global pitch competitions. At a pitch competition, teams of students can pitch their business ideas with the opportunity to win significant cash prizes and investments to kick-start their businesses. Win or lose, the competitions allow for important mentorship, advisory support, opportunities to network with important people in the industry, including investors and instant validation for a business idea.

There are several business schools around the world offering such opportunities, including, but not limited to, the following:

The Global Social Venture Competition, based at the University of California, Berkeley, provides aspiring entrepreneurs with mentoring, PR, and $50,000 in prizes to transform their ideas into businesses that will have positive real-world impact. Teams are evaluated over three rounds: at their school, at the regional semi-finals and at the global finals. At each stage, they get support and feedback from local experts and social entrepreneurs. Last year, GSVC received more than 500 entries from 40 countries. This year, the finals will take place in Thailand at Thammasat Business School. This will be the first time the finals are held outside the US.

Morgan Stanley and Kellogg School of Management, along with international partners INSEAD and the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, created the Sustainable Investing Challenge. This pitch competition for graduate students focuses on developing institutional-quality investment vehicles that seek positive environmental or social impact and competitive financial returns. The winners of last year’s challenge formed their own start-up in the world of conservation finance based on their winning entry involving the creation of Forest Resilience Bonds in the US. This year, the deadline for applying is February 24th, 2016 and ten finalist teams will gather in Hong Kong in April 2016 to pitch their financial investment proposals for specific social or environmental projects. Last year, 127 teams entered, representing 78 schools from 20 countries.

The Intel Global Challenge at University of California, Berkeley, is the world’s largest and most prestigious technology entrepreneurship competition, attracting more than 20,000 young innovators and entrepreneurs from 60 countries. Finalists present their work to experienced entrepreneurs and venture capitalists at regional and final competitions as they vie for $100,000 in prizes. The winners are considered those that have the most potential to make a positive impact on society.

The Sustainability Innovation Student Challenge Award was launched by Dow in 2009 to promote forward-thinking in social and environmental responsibility. The challenge engages students from 18 universities around the world to come up with solutions that are interdisciplinary in nature, represent innovative thinking, and have the potential for solving world challenges in alignment with the spirit of Dow’s Sustainability Goals. The winning university receives $10,000 USD in prizes.

The Lee Kuan Yew Global Business Plan Competition at Singapore Management University is aimed at undergraduate students from around the world who, if chosen, stand to win up to $60,000 USD in cash, prizes and business development opportunities. Teams submit a business plan that goes through preliminary and semi-final rounds before making it to the final round in Singapore. There is also a cash award granted to the “Most Promising Young Entrepreneur.” Last year’s competition saw 121 business plans from 336 students representing 28 countries. Over time, there has been an increase in the number of plans that relate to sustainability.

London Business School and the University College of London launched the Cleantech Challenge. Teams of students from around the world develop their clean technology business ideas through a three-stage competition that runs from November through April. They receive guidance, feedback and mentorship from industry professionals throughout the Challenge. Ten finalist teams compete in a live “Boot Camp” final in London for a chance to win GBP 10,000 in cash.

The Hult Prize Foundation is a start-up accelerator for budding young social entrepreneurs emerging from universities worldwide. The prize, awarded annually, aims to inspire the creation and launch of the most compelling social business ideas. Winners receive USD 1 million in seed capital, as well as mentorship and advice from the international business community. Last year’s winner was National Chengchi University from Taiwan. The 2016 challenge looks at crowded urban spaces, and poses the following question: can we build sustainable, scalable and fast growing social enterprises that double the income of 10 million people residing in crowded urban spaces by better connecting people, goods, services and capital?

Does your school have a pitch competition? Share the details in the comments below.

2015 Good Practices in Responsible Management Education (Part 2)

It is once again time for PRiMEtime’s year-end review. 2015 was another exciting year with a lot of innovative new initiatives and approaches at business schools around the world to embedding responsible leadership and sustainability into their programmes. Sixty articles were posted featuring over 182 examples from more than 114 schools in 38 countries. In this 2-part year-end post we review what happened this year and what we have to look forward to next year. (Click here to view Part 1)

Principle 5Principle 5: Partnerships

A growing number of schools are partnering with local businesses to advance sustainability on campus and beyond. In fact, through a new project between Global Compact LEAD and PRME Champions many of these partnerships were highlighted this year including The American University in Cairo’s Women on Boards programme, the development of local sustainability networks by ESPAE, University of Guelph partnership around food, Novo School of Business and Economics’ partnership around children consumer behaviour and the University of Technology Sydney partnership around insurers role in sustainable growth. Additional resources were providing to assist schools in developing new partnerships including 5 Key Messages from Business to Business Schools Around Sustainability and 10 Tips.

Another feature focused on examples of schools engaging with local governments in Turkey, Brazil, Australia, US, UK and Latvia.

Principle 6Principle 6: Dialogue

Most of the examples presented through the year have also involved dialogue around responsible management topics, across the campus and beyond. As always, many posts featured Sharing Information on Progress Reports including an overview of the newly released Basic Guide to Sharing Information on Progress, as well as a two part series on visuals to get inspired by for your next SIP report.

A number of Sharing Information on Progress Reports were featured and celebrated this year including Reykjavik University’s first report, Ivey Business School’s experiences communicating the big picture through their SIP, the recipients of the Recognition of Sharing Information on Progress Reports were highlighted including KEDGE Business School.

Principle “7”: Organisational Practices

PRME signatories globally are increasingly active in creating more sustainable campuses. Coventry University shared their experiences in gaining sustainability accreditation in the UK. A two-part feature on sustainable buildings on campus highlighted a range of approaches being taken by schools around the world.

Last but not least, as businesses become more engaged in sustainability around the world, we are presented with an increasing range of examples of active companies to highlight in the classroom. Featured sustainable business examples collected from faculty in 2015 included:

Thank you for a fantastic 2015 and for contributing all of your good practice examples and stories. We encourage you to engage with the discussion and promotion of PRME and the Sustainable Development Agenda on all levels, including our Chapters and working Groups, as well as through Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter.

2016 will be another exciting year in the field of management education and sustainability in particular through the Sustainable Development Goals and business-business school partnerships. If there are any topics in particular you would like to see covered, or you would like your initiatives to be featured, please do not hesitate to contact me at gweybrecht@thesustainablemba.com.

2015 Good Practices in Responsible Management Education (Part 1)

It is once again time for PRiMEtime’s year-end review. 2015 was another exciting year with a lot of innovative new initiatives and approaches at business schools around the world embedding responsible leadership and sustainability into their programmes. Sixty articles were posted over the year on responsible management education, featuring over 182 examples from more than 114 schools in 38 countries. In this 2-part year-end post we review what happened this year and what we have to look forward to next year.

Principle 1Principle 1: Purpose

2015 of course was the year of the PRME Global Forum. A post of student views on business as a force for good as well as what the future corporation will look like, highlighted the power of students in being innovative thought leaders. Several key documents were launched during the Forum and featured on PRiMEtime including The State of Sustainability and Management Education.

In September a call to action was made to higher education institutions to join in making a commitment to support refugees in crisis. The PRME community stepped up with a number of initiatives featured in this post. Two posts on Higher Education for Climate Change Action coincided with the Higher Education Sustainability Initiative meeting in October and featured a number of examples of business schools taking action around this important issue.

As the international community is preparing to launch the Post-2015 Development Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals in 2016, a growing focus of PRiMEtime and the wider PRME community has been understanding how business schools can engage in the process and contribute to achieving the goals once they are put in place. Several updates were posted including this overview and update.

Principle 2Principle 2: Values

As the sister initiative to the Global Compact, several Global Compact resources were featured including Finance and Sustainability Resources and Ways to Engage and a look at the building blocks for transforming business and changing the world. We also looked at a number of other resources available to the PRME community including ways that schools are using technology in the classroom to teach sustainability, a selection of MOOCs on Sustainability/Ethics for Fall 2015 as well as for Spring 2015.

Several posts featured International Days focused on highlighting and celebrating specific sustainability related topics. This included a look at how management education is engaging high school students in sustainable business for International Youth Day, schools engaged in sustainable energy projects for the International Year of Light, a two part feature on schools engaged in sustainable food for World Health Day, and women and management education for International Women’s Day

Principle 3Principle 3: Method

PRME schools shared their experiences in re-designing their programmes to embed sustainability more fully including Stockholm School of Economics, University of New South Wales, Jonkoping International Business School, and the University of Wollongong. This included new courses such as Peter J. Tobin College of Business introducing all students to not-for-profit management, students engaging in their communities including innovative projects at Great Lakes Institute of Management, and Willamette University Atkinson Graduate School of Management’s MBA for Life programme. ISAE/FGV shared their experiences in engaging stakeholders in prioritising their sustainability strategy moving forward.

Principle 4Principle 4: Research

Schools continue to conduct a number of important research projects around the topic of sustainability, ethics and responsible management focused on their particular regions, including the development of case studies on sustainable production and consumption for the business community at the Universiti Sains Malaysia.

A growing focus is being put on interdisciplinary collaboration and projects including at Stockholm School of Economics, Aarhus University and the Maasai Mara in Kenya, and the development of an interdisciplinary sustainability research network at University of Nottingham.

Several new publications were introduced which highlight research and the key role that faculty play in embedding sustainability and responsible management into the curriculum including Faculty Development for responsible management education and an Inspirational Guide for the Implementation of PRME featuring examples from UK and Ireland.

 Part 2 will be posted on January 4th, 2016.

Business School Response to the Refugee Crisis

refugeesSixty million people have been displaced by conflict and over 410,000 people have crossed the Mediterranean from the Middle East so far this year. Although the primary responsibility for peace rests with governments, the urgency of the global refugee crisis is a challenge that requires support from all actors in society on a short-, mid- and long-term basis.

One month ago today the PRME Secretariat, together with AACSB, AABS, ABIS, AMBA, CEEMAN, CLADEA, EFMD, GMAC, GRLI and EAUC issued a call to action to business schools and management-related higher education institutions (HEIs) in response to the refugee crisis. The call was made in response to a similar call made by the UN Global Compact and the UN Refugee Agency for business to take action.

The leaders of the international academic community were called to take action and address the refugee crisis by providing access to scholarships to business and entrepreneurship related classes and knowledge resources to refugees but also by raising awareness and understanding regarding the situation of refugees, and foster social cohesion. By joining forces with business, governments, UN agencies, civil society organisations and/or other HEIs, business schools can forge long-term partnerships for education and sustainable development.

The following are just a few of the many ways that business schools are responding to this crisis.

Through Collaborative Solutions

The Centre for Education on Social Responsibility at the Leeds School of Business, CU Boulder (USA) is taking a leadership role by convening relevant groups (local government, non-profits, businesses, and business schools) to address the topic of the responsibility of business and business schools to help address the refugee crisis. The meetings will consider the economic stability, employment for refugees and benefits to local employers within the Denver and Boulder business and civic communities.

By Engaging Students and Staff

ALBA Graduate Business School (Greece) collected information on how individuals can help the incoming refugees that was sent to all students, alumni, faculty and staff. Among other things, it gave directions on how to collect items and send them to the NGOs. ALBA has already offered an MBA full scholarship to a young refugee from Africa

The French Education & Research Ministry made a recent appeal to universities in France to propose solutions and actions that would facilitate the welcoming and integration of Syrian, Iraqi and Eritrean refugees. Grenoble Ecole de Management (France) has extended their criteria for the school’s volunteer skills-sharing policy to encourage GEM employees to dedicate 1- 5 days a year of their work-time to help welcome and integrate newly arrived refugees in collaboration with local associations and humanitarian organisations. GEM’s annual Geopolitical Festival in March 2016 will also highlight this urgent issue by hosting a range of activities focused that will examine and discuss the causes, the consequences and potential sustainable and human-focused solutions to this global crisis.

Engaging Refugees

Roughly 3000 refugees are accommodated in Leipzig at an emergency camp located next campus. HHL – Leipzig Graduate School of Management (Germany) opened a collecting point for donations, which are allocated to the refugees. Financial donations received via their graduate students will be used to purchase picture dictionaries in order to support language efforts. Fifteen language interpreters from across campus coordinated the matching of language interpreters with activities. One of these activities is “Neighbour meets Neighbour”, where the refugees can introduce their regional food to students and staff on campus and get in touch with the community. Another initiative has also been put in place to host indoor activities for the refugees at campus, such as a seminar room for a Refugee Law Clinic. HHL is currently organising a field project where students will work for three months with refugee support coordination bodies and a PhD thesis is underway focusing on opportunities and challenges of labour market inclusion for Germany is also in progress. The School is also planning trainings and mini courses aimed at supporting the necessary qualifications of the refugees.

Through Coursework

Hanken School of Economics (Finland) hosts the Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Research Institute (HUMLOG Institute), which is a joint research institute founded by Hanken School of Economics and the National Defence University of Finland. The aim of the HUMLOG Institute is to “to research the area of humanitarian logistics in disaster preparedness, response and recovery with the intention of influencing future activities in a way that will provide measurable benefits to persons requiring assistance”. Through this Institute, Hanken offers a course on humanitarian logistics and students in the course have been encouraged to volunteer to help in coping with the current refugee crisis. They are currently exploring the opportunity to have one project on the refugee crisis in the course this year.

Scholarships

  • Alfred Nobel Open Business School (China) will provide five scholarships to their online e-MBA for registered and selected refugees having business background.
  • Euclid University (Gambia) will be announcing specific full and partial scholarship programmes for qualifying displaced persons and refugees.
  • Haaga-Helia University (Finland) has a proposal a special intake for refugees to study entrepreneurship, languages, sales and service skills as well as career planning. After these studies, they could be admitted as regular students.
  • ESAN Graduate School of Business (Peru) will offer three scholarships to refugees.
  • University of Warsaw (Poland) will provide an access to business and entrepreneurship related classes and a number of scholarships will be offered.
  • University of Strathclyde Business School (UK) is developing a scholarship with the Scottish Refugee Council intended to help asylum seekers and those staying in the UK on humanitarian grounds.
  • SDA Bocconi School of Management (Italy) already offers two open courses (strategy and finance) free of charge aimed at increasing the employability of young people. This course will now also be open to refugees.
  • Grenoble Ecole de Management (France) will offer admission to 5-10 qualified student refugees to study in one of the schools’ programmes.

 

To submit your pledge visit https://business.un.org/pledge_refugee_crisis

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