2015 Good Practices in Responsible Management Education (Part 2)

It is once again time for PRiMEtime’s year-end review. 2015 was another exciting year with a lot of innovative new initiatives and approaches at business schools around the world to embedding responsible leadership and sustainability into their programmes. Sixty articles were posted featuring over 182 examples from more than 114 schools in 38 countries. In this 2-part year-end post we review what happened this year and what we have to look forward to next year. (Click here to view Part 1)

Principle 5Principle 5: Partnerships

A growing number of schools are partnering with local businesses to advance sustainability on campus and beyond. In fact, through a new project between Global Compact LEAD and PRME Champions many of these partnerships were highlighted this year including The American University in Cairo’s Women on Boards programme, the development of local sustainability networks by ESPAE, University of Guelph partnership around food, Novo School of Business and Economics’ partnership around children consumer behaviour and the University of Technology Sydney partnership around insurers role in sustainable growth. Additional resources were providing to assist schools in developing new partnerships including 5 Key Messages from Business to Business Schools Around Sustainability and 10 Tips.

Another feature focused on examples of schools engaging with local governments in Turkey, Brazil, Australia, US, UK and Latvia.

Principle 6Principle 6: Dialogue

Most of the examples presented through the year have also involved dialogue around responsible management topics, across the campus and beyond. As always, many posts featured Sharing Information on Progress Reports including an overview of the newly released Basic Guide to Sharing Information on Progress, as well as a two part series on visuals to get inspired by for your next SIP report.

A number of Sharing Information on Progress Reports were featured and celebrated this year including Reykjavik University’s first report, Ivey Business School’s experiences communicating the big picture through their SIP, the recipients of the Recognition of Sharing Information on Progress Reports were highlighted including KEDGE Business School.

Principle “7”: Organisational Practices

PRME signatories globally are increasingly active in creating more sustainable campuses. Coventry University shared their experiences in gaining sustainability accreditation in the UK. A two-part feature on sustainable buildings on campus highlighted a range of approaches being taken by schools around the world.

Last but not least, as businesses become more engaged in sustainability around the world, we are presented with an increasing range of examples of active companies to highlight in the classroom. Featured sustainable business examples collected from faculty in 2015 included:

Thank you for a fantastic 2015 and for contributing all of your good practice examples and stories. We encourage you to engage with the discussion and promotion of PRME and the Sustainable Development Agenda on all levels, including our Chapters and working Groups, as well as through Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter.

2016 will be another exciting year in the field of management education and sustainability in particular through the Sustainable Development Goals and business-business school partnerships. If there are any topics in particular you would like to see covered, or you would like your initiatives to be featured, please do not hesitate to contact me at gweybrecht@thesustainablemba.com.

2015 Good Practices in Responsible Management Education (Part 1)

It is once again time for PRiMEtime’s year-end review. 2015 was another exciting year with a lot of innovative new initiatives and approaches at business schools around the world embedding responsible leadership and sustainability into their programmes. Sixty articles were posted over the year on responsible management education, featuring over 182 examples from more than 114 schools in 38 countries. In this 2-part year-end post we review what happened this year and what we have to look forward to next year.

Principle 1Principle 1: Purpose

2015 of course was the year of the PRME Global Forum. A post of student views on business as a force for good as well as what the future corporation will look like, highlighted the power of students in being innovative thought leaders. Several key documents were launched during the Forum and featured on PRiMEtime including The State of Sustainability and Management Education.

In September a call to action was made to higher education institutions to join in making a commitment to support refugees in crisis. The PRME community stepped up with a number of initiatives featured in this post. Two posts on Higher Education for Climate Change Action coincided with the Higher Education Sustainability Initiative meeting in October and featured a number of examples of business schools taking action around this important issue.

As the international community is preparing to launch the Post-2015 Development Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals in 2016, a growing focus of PRiMEtime and the wider PRME community has been understanding how business schools can engage in the process and contribute to achieving the goals once they are put in place. Several updates were posted including this overview and update.

Principle 2Principle 2: Values

As the sister initiative to the Global Compact, several Global Compact resources were featured including Finance and Sustainability Resources and Ways to Engage and a look at the building blocks for transforming business and changing the world. We also looked at a number of other resources available to the PRME community including ways that schools are using technology in the classroom to teach sustainability, a selection of MOOCs on Sustainability/Ethics for Fall 2015 as well as for Spring 2015.

Several posts featured International Days focused on highlighting and celebrating specific sustainability related topics. This included a look at how management education is engaging high school students in sustainable business for International Youth Day, schools engaged in sustainable energy projects for the International Year of Light, a two part feature on schools engaged in sustainable food for World Health Day, and women and management education for International Women’s Day

Principle 3Principle 3: Method

PRME schools shared their experiences in re-designing their programmes to embed sustainability more fully including Stockholm School of Economics, University of New South Wales, Jonkoping International Business School, and the University of Wollongong. This included new courses such as Peter J. Tobin College of Business introducing all students to not-for-profit management, students engaging in their communities including innovative projects at Great Lakes Institute of Management, and Willamette University Atkinson Graduate School of Management’s MBA for Life programme. ISAE/FGV shared their experiences in engaging stakeholders in prioritising their sustainability strategy moving forward.

Principle 4Principle 4: Research

Schools continue to conduct a number of important research projects around the topic of sustainability, ethics and responsible management focused on their particular regions, including the development of case studies on sustainable production and consumption for the business community at the Universiti Sains Malaysia.

A growing focus is being put on interdisciplinary collaboration and projects including at Stockholm School of Economics, Aarhus University and the Maasai Mara in Kenya, and the development of an interdisciplinary sustainability research network at University of Nottingham.

Several new publications were introduced which highlight research and the key role that faculty play in embedding sustainability and responsible management into the curriculum including Faculty Development for responsible management education and an Inspirational Guide for the Implementation of PRME featuring examples from UK and Ireland.

 Part 2 will be posted on January 4th, 2016.

2015 is the International Year of Light – Sustainable Energy (Part 2)

International Year of LightEvery year the UN chooses one or two themes that are celebrated throughout the year by governments, local organisations, businesses and educational institutions. This year was proclaimed the International Year of Light and Light-based Technologies, and focuses on the topic of light science and its applications with the aim of recognising the importance of light-based technologies, promoting sustainable development and providing solutions to global challenges in energy, education, agriculture and health. Additionally, access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all is Goal 7 of the proposed Sustainable Development Goals. In celebration of the International Year of Light, the following week will focus on sustainable energy and feature a range of initiatives and programmes implemented on the topic at universities internationally. To view part 1 of this two part series click here.

Several schools are developing new programmes focused on energy related topics, in particular around sustainable and renewable energies. In the Netherlands, Rotterdam School of Management’s Future Energy Business holds a three day programme which aims to prepare students to not only navigate energy business and its advances such as renewable generation, storage, electric mobility and ongoing ICT innovations, but to shape the energy landscape of the future. Participants gain insights into future energy infrastructures, the dynamics of energy markets and stakeholders, and learn the skills needed to develop compelling, actionable strategies and discuss them with leaders in industry and policy.

Toulouse Business School, in France, has developed a specialised Master’s in Sustainable Development and Climate Change in 2008. The programme is accredited jointly by the National Meteorological School and the National School of Life Sciences. The school also offers training on carbon accounting for students more generally across the school.

Glasgow Caledonian University’s (GCU) Centre for Climate Justice is a key member of a 20 month project called, ‘Scotland Lights Up Malawi,’ which aims to encourage communities in Malawi to replace dangerous and costly kerosene lamps, batteries and candles with environmentally more friendly solar lighting that also helps families reduce expenditures and thus has potential to reduce poverty. The project is partly funded by the Scottish Government and involves GCU in partnership with SolarAid establishing the social enterprise in Malawi called SunnyMoney. The enterprise will promote and sell solar lighting.

There are many ways that students are engaging in the topic of sustainable and renewable energy. Master’s students at Sabanci University, in Turkey, organised a case competition in 2014 to bring creative ideas and multi-cultural insights into organising the first Solar Grand Prix Monaco. Organised by Solar 1, with the support of SAS Prince Albert II in partnership with the Monaco Yacht Club, this event aimed to promote the use of solar power in boats, using innovative ideas from young engineers and entrepreneurs worldwide. The students had to draft a mini business plan, summarising their ideas, views and recommendations on how to successfully build up and organise this first and unique event.

On campus students are also coming together into student clubs on energy sustainability, for example at Athens University of Economics and Business, in Greece. The university’s Energy & Sustainability Club involves both students and alumni to raise awareness, and mobilise students and the broader community through workshops, seminars, conferences and short-term field projects. Students from both Copenhagen Business School and the University of Copenhagen, in Denmark, established the Danish Association for Energy Economics chapter, an affiliate of the International Association for Energy Economics. The chapter aims to gather students, companies and researchers to discuss future energy solutions in order to fill a gap in the energy debate in Denmark. The chapter hosts events related to energy policy, research and business.

Finally, universities are exploring how to be more energy efficient within their own campuses. Ivey Business School, in Canada, is doing a lighting retrofit—a five-year plan to eliminate inefficient lighting on campus. Energy-saving T8 ballasts are replacing nearly 50,000 T12 fixtures that illuminate the rooms and halls in dozens of campus buildings. The project will pay for itself through energy savings in about three years. The new fixtures are estimated to use at least 30 per cent less energy than the previous fixtures. In addition to being more efficient, the new lamps also have a greater quality of light output.

The University of Winchester, in the UK, is a member of the Carbon Trust’s Higher Education Carbon Management programme, and a number of initiatives are in place across the campus to cut their carbon footprint. The Business School is part of the University’s commitment to reduce carbon dioxide emissions per square meter to 30% below the 2006 levels by 2016.

Several universities across Europe take place in the annual European Sustainable Energy Week Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, in Italy, uses the opportunity to raise awareness about energy efficiency on its campus. They take part in a campaign called “M’illumino di meno,” which means ‘I am using less light.’ On this day in February, throughout Italy individuals, businesses, monuments turn off their lights as a way of raising awareness about sustainable consumption. Many schools also take part in Earth Hour celebrations (which next year will be on the 19th of March) where millions around the world turn off their lights for one hour as a way to raise awareness about climate change.

Showcasing and Inspiring Action – UK and Ireland Edition

UK/Ireland Inspirational GuideAs of June 2014, 48 business schools in the UK and Ireland, out of a total number of around 110 in the region, have signed up to PRME. These schools have joined forces in creating the regional PRME Chapter UK & Ireland. In order to bring together their common experiences, inspire more action in their schools and encourage other schools in the region to implement PRME, they recently launched the Inspirational Guide for the Implementation of PRME UK & Ireland Edition.

Seventeen business schools contributed to the guide, which is divided into three main areas: examining the values and mission for the school, developing centres and outreach initiatives embedding the values of PRME, and developing programmes in research and learning and teaching. Each case story focuses on a particular programme, project or activity that the institution has implemented, and provides an overview of the particular challenges faced, an explanation of the actions taken in relation to those challenges, what were the results, and advice and ideas for other signatories.

I spoke with Alan Murray from Winchester Business School, co-editor of the guide, about putting this collection together and their experiences and lessons learnt.

Why did the UK & Ireland Chapter decide to put together an inspirational guide?

As one of the first Established Chapters, and being conscious of our status as having one of the highest proportions regionally of PRME signatory schools, we wanted to put a regional spin on the PRME Inspirational Guides (see here editions 1 and 2). We also wanted to highlight some of the very innovative initiatives being undertaken in the UK and Ireland in the field of sustainability education and community involvement.

How did you put it together?

We have a good working relationship with the publishers, Greenleaf, having a number of individual members of the Chapter already part of editorial teams compiling edited editions on Poverty and Gender, as well as being authors with Greenleaf in their own right. Greenleaf was very supportive of the idea, and when the PRME office gave us their sanction, all that was left was to get the Chapter members in. Initially we put out a call, but followed that up with a theme at the first Chapter symposium, held at Winchester Business School in April 2014. At this meeting we hatched an ambitious plan to compile and edit the book in 4 months, to allow a launch at the British Academy of Management meeting in Belfast in September 2014. We asked for volunteers to be part of the editorial team and devised a schema to review and return chapters in double quick time. And we succeeded!

How was the response?

The response was very positive and we received more submissions than we expected given the time frame. You will see from the range of activities covered that some very exciting initiatives have been developed and schools were keen to inform the Chapter signatories and the wider UK and Ireland business school community of their endeavors.

Any advice for other Chapters that might be interested in doing the same?

Yes – allow more time! A good team of editors, all of whom are willing to commit time and effort is essential! The team at Greenleaf are brilliant and they can help sort out most issues.

What’s next now for the Chapter (related to how the guide will be used or more generally)?

We are going to send out a copy to the Dean of every school in the UK and Ireland that has not signed up to PRME, to showcase the activities of schools within our community and highlight the benefits to be gained being part of that community.

 

What you can expect to find in the Inspirational Guide

1. An examination of the values and mission for the school

Strathclyde Business School shares their experiences in creating their Management Development programme, intended to provide an intellectual and experiential spine to their undergraduate degrees. Newcastle University Business School discusses the PRME agenda and how it can add value to its stakeholders, as well as discussing their research agendas on gender equality and the PRME Working Group on Gender Equality.

2. Developing centres and outreach initiatives embedding the values of PRME

Lancaster University Management School shares their experiences re-launching their Leadership Centre. Winchester Business School and University of Huddersfield Business School both explore their lessons learnt around creating new centres focused on sustainability related topics, and integrating PRME into their programmes and centres.

Kemmy School of Business shares their experiences in establishing both a centre as well as a new programme on Innovation, Creativity and Entrepreneurship. Bournemouth University Business School and Hertfordshire Business School share their approaches to engaging students in local projects through experiential learning. Finally, Glasgow Caledonian University shares their work on how to tackle the issue of widening access to higher education.

3. Developing programmes in research and learning, and teaching

Coventry University Business School, UCD School of Business, Winchester University, and Bradford University School of Management all share their diverse experiences in developing new modules in research and learning, and teaching. University of Huddersfield Business School outlines how they use group work to improve critical thinking skills, Manchester Metropolitan University Business School shares how they use field trips to bring their classroom messages across, and Durham University Business School challenges students to use their skills in real-life situations. Henley Business School presents their MA in Leadership, which uses innovative teaching technologies, and Aston’s Business School shares lessons from developing its MSc in Social Responsibility and Sustainability. Glasgow Caledonian University outlines how they reviewed their curriculum to reflect PRME values.

2014 Good Practices in Responsible Management Education (Part 1)

It is that time again for PRiMEtime’s year-end review. 2014 was another exciting year with a lot of innovative new initiatives and approaches at business schools around the world embedding responsible leadership and sustainability into their programmes. More than 60 articles were posted over the year on responsible management education, featuring over 200 examples from more than 100 schools in 37 countries. In this 2-part year-end post we review what happened this year and what we have to look forward to next year.

Principle 1Principle 1: Purpose

As the international community is preparing the post-2015 agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals, a growing focus of PRiMEtime and the wider PRME community has been how business schools can get engaged in the process and be a part of reaching the goals once they are put in place. The Post-2015 process provided an overview of how the goals are being put together through international consultations, and in particular about the business sector contributions to the process through the UN Global Compact (part 1 and part 2). In July we looked at the thoughts of a panel of distinguished guests at the PRME Champions meeting in NYC around what role business schools have in the Sustainable Development Goals. More recently, an overview of resources available for business schools was presented related to the UN Climate Summit and Private Sector Forum—the largest climate meeting yet—bringing together more than 125 heads of state as well as business leaders. We also looked at the discussions happening around Carbon Pricing, one of the main themes of the Private Sector Forum, as well as the growing number of resources available through the Global Compact for faculty and students in particular around Human Rights and Business for Peace.

2014 celebrated a number of International Days (Jan-May) organised by the United Nations, aimed at raising awareness about different sustainability topics, that provide numerous ways to engage students and staff. On World Food Day we took a look at what business schools are doing to raise awareness about food issues at a local level (Part 1 and Part 2). The 2014 International Year of Small Island Developing States gave us a chance to celebrate the approaches taken by Arthur Lok Jack Graduate School of Business (Trinidad and Tobago), Lee Kong Chian School of Business (Singapore) and Barna Business School (Dominican Republic). In recognition of International Anti-Corruption Day on the 9th of December, two posts focused on engaging students in this topic, the first, Ten ways to bring anti-corruption discussions into the classroom and then a second, ten more ways to bring anti-corruption discussions into the classroom.

Principle 2Principle 2: Values

KU Leuven Faculty of Economics and Business shared their experiences aligning sustainability efforts across numerous campuses after a merger, and described how they created their joint Sharing Information on Progress Reports (SIP) report. We also had the chance to learn about how Hanken School of Economics put together their Sharing Information on Progress (SIP) report and what tips they have for others.

Soegljapranata Catholic University, in Indonesia, and Management College of South Africa, are both developing their own “Green” and “Ethics” strategies for their students while UASM-Universidad de los Andes, in Colombia, is currently exploring the impact of internalising PRME and exploring the extent to which academic programmes and research in this area influence students. EMFD shared information about their Business School Impact Survey launched this past year.

Schools continue to organise several special events for students and staff to engage in sustainability related topics. Louvain School of Management (Belgium) organised the “LSM Cup: Ethics in Business,” an inter-faculty, multidisciplinary business game focused on CSR. San Francisco State University College of Business (USA) reported on their Business Ethics Week with ethics related modules and speakers. Universidad del Cono Sur de las Americas (Paraguay) has an annual event called “Contest of Crazy Ideas,” which invites students to develop creative ideas focused around social responsibility. Lviv Business School (Ukraine) five-day interdisciplinary retreat brings together faculty, entrepreneurs, religious leaders, artists and other individuals to discuss and explore leadership, ethics, values and trust. Cameron School of Business (USA) and ESIC (Spain) have both created microcredit lending programmes. IE Business School (Spain) Venture Lab incubates the development and consolidation of social and responsible startups.

Principle 3Principle 3: Method

Several schools engage their students in thinking about business in different ways, right from the first day on campus. The University of Guelph College of Business and Economics (Canada) runs a student competition where students are given 1$ of seed capital and challenged to take their ideas, develop and operate a business, and generate as much real wealth as possible within a month. At Gustavson School of Business (Canada), “MIIISsion Impossible” is an innovative one-day programme that engages students to build a social responsible business idea in teams.

Schools continue to develop a range of different ways to teach students about responsible management topics. Several MOOCs were run quite successfully between September and December (part 1 and part 2). Otto Beisheim School of Management (Germany) shared their approach to using online tools to engage students in sustainability through their Sustainability Lab. HHL Leipzig Graduate School of Management (Germany) is using co-teaching as a better way to communicate responsibility and ethics to students. Stephanie Bertels from Beedie School of Business (Canada) shared with us an example of an assignment she uses in the classroom focused on sustainability.

Several schools continue to provide more structured options for students to get hands on experience. “Humacite Service Learning Mission,” at La Rochelle Business School (France), is a mandatory three-month service learning mission for students. University of Victoria Gustavson School of Business (Canada) has 3 four-month work terms through its Co-op Programme, giving students the opportunity to try out different jobs, build competencies and earn income. Auckland University of Technology Business School (New Zealand) requires students to reflect on ethical decision-making during their nine-week work placement.

Principle 4Principle 4: Research

Schools continue to conduct a number of important research projects around the topic of sustainability, ethics and responsible management focused on their particular regions, including Nova School of Business and Economics’ (Portugal) research on business and economic development in Africa. Management Center Innsbruck (Austria) focuses on social responsibility in eastern Austria and the University of New England (Australia) focuses research around carbon taxes. ESCI (Spain) has been exploring how to improve the recycling of clothing and fabric in collaboration with Spanish company Mango. Universidad del Norte (Colombia) is creating a database of case studies focused on sustainability in collaboration with the Global Compact Local Network. Gordon Institute of Business Sciences (South Africa) launched the GIBS Dynamic Market Index, and is the new host of the Network for Business South Africa in partnership with the Graduate School of Business at the University of Cape Town.

Milgard School of Business (USA) shared their experiences in creating the effective Centre for Leadership & Social Responsibility and the impact it has had on the University and beyond. European College of Economics and Management (Bulgaria) created a new peer-reviewed journal for students called Science and Business. The Benedictine University’s College (USA) has created new innovative PhD programme focused on ethics. Martin-Luther University Halle-Wittenberg students work with the German Development Agency (GIZ) to analyse projects carried out by the organisation.

Copenhagen Business School (Denmark) has launched a collection of cases around responsible management available for free through their website.

Part 2 will be posted on January 1st, 2015.

Developing a Sustainable Food Industry in Ireland – University College Dublin

OriginGreenThe School of Business at the University College Dublin, Ireland has been building its portfolio of activities in the field of responsible management through research and teaching endeavours, and additionally, through an innovative partnership with Bord Bia, the Irish Food Board. The partnership with Bord Bia aims to promote and strengthen the food board’s Origin Green programme, a national sustainability initiative aimed at the food industry, through the joint development of an M.Sc. in Business Sustainability. I spoke with Dr. Colm Mclaughlin, the PRME Co-ordinator from UCD School of Business about this partnership.

1. What is Origin Green?

Developed by Bord Bia, the Irish Food Board, Origin Green is a national sustainability initiative that seeks to build a credible standard of sustainability for individual Irish food and drink manufacturers, and that enhances the reputation of Ireland as a sustainable food and drink producing nation. Underpinning Origin Green is a range of metrics and processes that have been developed around farming, production, supply chain management, water management, energy conservation, biodiversity, greenhouse gas emissions, health, and nutrition. In order to be part of the programme, participating firms are required to commit to the Origin Green Sustainability Charter. Participating companies must demonstrate a strong commitment at senior management level and throughout the organization to deliver continuous improvement in their performance over time. Companies are being asked to sign up to developing and implementing an action plan covering a period of up to five years, which can be renewed or updated as appropriate at the end of the period.

Bord Bia officially launched the Origin Green initiative in June 2012 and is currently working with Irish food and drink companies in building participation and commitment to the programme. Almost 300 food and drink manufacturers have registered their commitment to take part in the Origin Green Programme to date. Thirty-eight of these are fully verified members while a further 50 have submitted draft plans. It is estimated that verified members account for almost 60% of food and drink exports. The programme has set a target of having 75% of exports covered by verified members by the end of 2014 with an ambition to have all Irish food and drink manufacturers as members of the programme.

2. What is the business school’s partnership with Bord Bia and Origin Green?

Bord Bia approached the UCD Michael Smurfit Graduate School of Business seeking to develop a partnership in order to build management capabilities to support the Origin Green sustainability programme. Borne of this conversation, an MSc, partially funded by the Irish food and drinks sector, was recently launched. The aim of the programme is to assist in fast-tracking the promotion and development of market awareness of Origin Green and the participating companies.

The MSc in Business Sustainability offers a formal learning and development programme on sustainability that will serve to develop a strong cohort of individuals who can then positively build awareness of Origin Green and thereby grow Ireland’s international market share for food and drink. The programme is an intensive one – over two years full-time, and with places for 11 students in the programme. It involves time in the classroom environment, participation in industry and sustainability events, a six month internship with an international food company learning about their sustainability practices, and a 12 month placement in a Bord Bia international export market where students learn to apply market awareness strategies of the Origin Green strategy with B2B customers.

3. How is your partnership with Bord Bia?

A positive and strong relationship has existed with Bord Bia for some time. We already run a graduate fellowship programme with them that focuses on building international sales and marketing skills, and a Diploma in Strategic Growth, which aims to develop management capabilities in the food industry. The addition of the MSc in Business Sustainability ties in with a number of strategic aims of the school, including a commitment to sustainability education, and making a contribution to national economic recovery through education.

4. What have been some of the challenges? Successes?

A range of challenges present themselves when running a programme like this for the first time. For example, while a wide range of international food companies have expressed a strong desire to be involved with the programme, the placements are not general work placements. It has taken time and effort to ensure that the nature of the projects that students will be learning from, as well as the team they will be joining, are in line with the programme’s objectives, so that real learning in the area of sustainability occurs. A definite success of the programme has been the opportunity to bring in Faculty from a range of international institutions to deliver content. Our content and design from this perspective makes the programme unique globally. Overall, the programme is running very smoothly, and the feedback so far has been very positive from all stakeholders. It is too early to assess the success of the programme, beyond the fact that it attracted a high calibre intake of students, and that industry was prepared to fund the programme. The ultimate test of the success of the programme will be further down the track: do the students stay in the industry and are they able to influence the sustainability practices of their employers.

The programme is still in its first cycle so this long-term impact has yet to be seen. Students that graduate from the programme will be experts in food and drink sustainability. They will go into industry with that knowledge and skill set, which will enable them to build awareness of the Origin Green brand, and influence the strategic decisions of their prospective employers. In doing so, they will contribute to building Ireland’s reputation as a sustainable food and drink producing nation.

5. What advice would you have for other schools thinking of putting something similar into place.

It is important that you have a very good relationship with the sponsoring agency. We would not have been able to run this programme without the strong connection with Bord Bia and their support for the programme. Develop relationships with firms in the sector, particularly those engaged in sustainability initiatives, as a programme of this sort relies on strong connections with industry. Allow a good lead in time in order to attract the best talent into the programme. And lastly, supplement traditional approaches to attracting students with modern methods – we have been using online promotion, industry networks and other non-traditional methods for promoting the programme.

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