Resources on the 17 Sustainable Development Goals – December edition – part 1 of 2

There are a growing number of excellent resources around the 17 Sustainable Development Goals, many of which can be used in the classroom or to inspire activities within University and Business School campuses. In this new series we will regularly feature a range of different resources that can be used to engage in, and raise awareness of the 17 SDGs. If you are creating new resources or have any favourites please send them so they can be featured as well. Part 1 will feature resources for Goals 1-9 and part 2 will feature resources for Goals 10 through to 17. For more Primetime posts related to the SDGs click here.

Assessing Bottlenecks: With the SDGs, the question is: What are the actions that will take us forward more quickly across a broader range of interlinked goals? This report explores the interlinkages and integrated nature of the SDGs and the need to go beyond silos to taking an integrated approach to development interventions. The SDG Accelerator and Bottleneck Assessment tool development by the UN Development Programme explores these.

Zero Hunger Challenge: The Zero Hunger Challenge reflects five elements from within the SDGs, which taken together, can end hunger, eliminate all forms of malnutrition and build inclusive and sustainable food systems. Stakeholders including universities can become participants of the Challenge by making a commitment to take action that will have a demonstrable, quantifiable impact. The challenge website also offers a range of resources and videos that can be used to create your own version of the Zero Hunger challenge on campus.

Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: This site includes a series of dilemmas and case studies that were developed to support efforts by business to respect human rights in their operations and supply chains. Cases are focused on a number of topics including living wages, working hours, human trafficking, doing business sin conflict affected countries and indigenous peoples’ rights.

World Youth Skills Day: Youth are almost three times more likely to be unemployed than adults and are continuously exposed to lower quality of jobs, greater labor market inequalities, and longer and more insecure school-to-work transitions. This is particularly the case for women. The 15th of July ,World Youth Skills Day, aims draw special attention to this issue. UNESCO has developed a special kit with a range of videos that can be used.

Women’s Empowerment Principles: Over 1,000 business leaders have adopted the Women Empowerment Principles that are used to empower women in the workplace, marketplace and community. The site includes a Gender Gap Analysis Tool to help companies identify strengths, gaps and opportunities to improve their performance eon gender equality as well as a series of resources that can be used in the classroom.

Guidance for Companies on Respecting the Human Rights to Water and Sanitation: This resource provides companies with practical measures on how to bring a human rights lens to their existing corporate water stewardship practices. It is on of several publications provided by the CEO Water Mandate, a group of companies working to develop, implement and disclose water sustainability polices and practices and sharing best and emerging practices.

Sustainable Energy for All: The site includes information to indicators for sustainable energy that give policy makers and investors detailed country-level insights for levelling the playing field for sustainable energy worldwide. ‘Heat maps’ available on the site, combine and analyse some of these data sets to show leaders where they can make the biggest and fastest inroads towards the SDGs.

Decent work and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: The International Labour works to set labour standards, develop policies and devise programmes promoting decent work for all. Their site offers a range of resources around decent work and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, a cross cutting theme that impacts and is impacted by many of the other SDGs. They also have a number of Notes on specific issues such as green jobs, national employment policies, skills and engaging the private sector on decent work.

The Equator Principles: The Equator Principles is a risk management framework, adopted by financial institutions, for determining, assessing and managing environmental and social risk in projects. It is primarily intended to provide a minimum standard for due diligence to support responsible risk decision-making. It currently covers over 70 percent of international Project Finance debt in emerging markets.

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